TROPICAL PLANT ENCYCLOPEDIA


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Number of plants found: 35     Next    Go to page:  1  2  3  4

Achimenes sp., Cupid's Bower, Hot Water Plant, Monkey-Faced Pansy, Magic Flower, Orchid Pansy

Achimenes sp.

Cupid's Bower, Hot Water Plant, Monkey-Faced Pansy, Magic Flower, Orchid Pansy
Family: Gesneriaceae
Origin: South America
Small shrub 2-5 ftSemi-shadeRegular waterModerate waterPink flowersWhite/off-white flowersBlue/lavender/purple flowersUnusual colorRed/crimson/vinous flowersYellow/orange flowers

Achimenes species and hybrids are commonly grown as greenhouse plants, or outdoors as bedding plants in subtropical regions. The species have been extensively hybridized, with many of the hybrids involving the large-flowered species A. grandiflora and A. longiflora. Many of the species and their hybrids have large, brightly colored flowers and are cultivated as ornamental greenhouse and bedding plants.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/achimenes_sp.htm

Adansonia digitata, Baobab, Cream of Tartar tree, Monkey-bread tree, Lemonade tree, Upside-down Tree

Adansonia digitata

Baobab, Cream of Tartar tree, Monkey-bread tree, Lemonade tree, Upside-down Tree
Family: Malvaceae   (Formerly:Bombacaceae)
Subfamily: Bombacoideae
Origin: South Africa
Big tree > 20 ftFull sunModerate waterWhite/off-white flowersOrnamental foliageEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.Attracts butterflies, hummingbirdsSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

Regarded as the largest succulent in the world, the baobab tree is steeped in a wealth of mystique, legend and superstition wherever it occurs in Africa. It is a tree that can provide food, water, shelter, and relief from sickness. During drought, elephants obtain moisture by chewing on the wood. The stem is covered with a bark layer, which may be 50-100 mm thick. The leaves are hand-sized and divided into 5-7 finger-like leaflets. The baobab is a deciduous, meaning that in winter, it sheds all of its leaves and grows new ones in spring. The large, pendulous flowers (up to 200 mm in diameter) are white and sweetly scented ,that are pollinated by bats. They are followed by velvety fruits full of edible acidic pulp sought by both monkeys and people. In the dryer, temperate regions of Africa, Baobabs are a tree of myth and legend. Baobabs are carefully tended by rural peoples and are particularly useful: the hollow trunks of baobabs are used as dwellings and storehouses, traditional medicines are obtained from its bark, leaves, and fruit. Its bark can be pounded to produce fibers that are used to make baskets, cloth, hats, mats, nets, rope, and strings (interestingly, after the bark is stripped away, the baobab grows new bark). Its leaves are cooked and eaten as greens, and are dried for use as a seasoning and a sauce and stew thickener. Its fruit is rich in vitamin C, calcium, and iron, and is called pain de singe or monkey bread. It can be roasted, ground, and boiled to make a coffee-substitute; it is also soaked in water to make a refreshing drink, and is used as a flavoring. They will make a handsome addition to a large garden, estate, or large parkland providing the soil is not waterlogged. Baobabs cannot tolerate even mild frost. When they are young, baobabs do not resemble their adult counterparts, the stems are thin and inconspicuous, and their leaves are simple and not divided into the five to seven lobes of the adult trees. Saplings can be effectively grown in containers or tubs for many years before becoming too large and requiring to be planted into the ground.

See article about this tree.

See how to grow Baobab bonsai

Article about endangered Baobabs.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/adansonia_digitata.htm

Annona glabra, Pond Apple, Alligator Apple, Monkey Apple

Annona glabra

Pond Apple, Alligator Apple, Monkey Apple
Family: Annonaceae
Origin: West Indies
Small tree 10-20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterYellow/orange flowersEdibleFlood tolerant

Pond apple (Annona glabra) native to swamplands of the southeastern United States. Although not as tasty as its tropical relatives (usually eaten raw, but sometimes made into jellies and wine), pond apple provides an important food source for wildlife of this region. Pond apple's can stand immense flooding and spend weeks at a time with their roots under water. The pond apple is very useful as a rootstock for other Annona species.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/annona_glabra.htm

Apeiba aspera, Monkey's Comb

Apeiba aspera

Monkey's Comb
Family: Malvaceae
Origin: Central America
Small tree 10-20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterYellow/orange flowersAttracts butterflies, hummingbirds

Yellow, heavily scented flowers are followed by interesting fruits that resemble sea urchins about 2" in diameter. These black fruits are covered with soft, short spines. Folk lore has it that these spiny fruit pods are used by monkeys as a comb.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/apeiba_aspera.htm

Apeiba tibourbou, Monkey's Comb

Apeiba tibourbou

Monkey's Comb
Family: Malvaceae
Origin: South America, Central America
Small tree 10-20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterYellow/orange flowersAttracts butterflies, hummingbirds

Yellow, heavily scented flowers are followed by interesting fruits that resemble sea urchins about 2" in diameter. These black fruits are covered with soft, short spines. Folk lore has it that these spiny fruit pods are used by monkeys as a comb.

The wood of Apeiba is soft and lightweight and used for rafts, the bark fibrous and used for making rope.



Apeiba tibourbou, Monkey's Comb


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/apeiba_tibourbou.htm

Araucaria araucana, Araucaria imbricata, Monkey Puzzle Tree, Chilean Pine

Araucaria araucana, Araucaria imbricata

Monkey Puzzle Tree, Chilean Pine
Family: Araucariaceae
Origin: South America
Big tree > 20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterModerate waterOrnamental foliageThorny or spinySeaside, salt tolerant plant

Among the most spectacular are forests of pure Araucaria Araucaria araucana, the hardiest of the genus, is a large, bizarre-looking evergreen, 60-70ft. tall and 30 to 35 feet wide, though the tallest specimens in its native haunts have been measured at over 150 ft. It forms a loose, symmetrical, see-through crown, pyramidal in youth, eventually with a rounded or flattish top. The scale-like leaves are dark green, stiff, sharp-pointed and densely arranged on upwardly-sweeping branches, looking more reptilian than coniferous in character. Because of this it comes to know surprise to most people that this species is estimated to be around 60 million years old, based upon fossil record known today.

Preferring well-drained, volcanic soil, this species is surprisingly tolerant of many soil types. It is very tolerant of maritime exposures, salt-laden winds, and thrives in cool, mild climates. It dislikes hot-dry soils and atmospheric pollution.

See article about Araucaria.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/araucaria_araucana.htm

Araucaria sp., Monkey Puzzle, Bunia Pine, Parana Nut
Araucaria heterophylla

Araucaria sp.

Monkey Puzzle, Bunia Pine, Parana Nut
Family: Araucariaceae
Origin: New Caledonia, Australia, South America
Big tree > 20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeModerate waterOrnamental foliageEdibleThorny or spinySubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

Araucaria is a genus of coniferous trees. There are 19 species in the genus, with a highly disjunct distribution in New Caledonia (where 13 species are endemic), Norfolk Island, eastern Australia, New Guinea, Argentina, Chile, and southern Brazil.

Fossil evidence indicates that ancestral araucaria forests resembling the present-day Monkey Puzzle date back to the age of dinosaurs.

Some of the species are relatively common in cultivation because of their distinctive, formal symmetrical growth habit. Several species are economically important for timber production and the edible seeds.

See article about Araucaria.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/araucaria_sp.htm

Barnebydendron riedelii, Phyllocarpus riedelii, Phyllocarpus septentrionalis, Monkey Flower Tree, Fire of Pakistan

Barnebydendron riedelii, Phyllocarpus riedelii, Phyllocarpus septentrionalis

Monkey Flower Tree, Fire of Pakistan
Family: Fabaceae
Subfamily: Caesalpinioideae
Origin: Central America
Big tree > 20 ftSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunRed/crimson/vinous flowersDeciduousAttracts butterflies, hummingbirds

The scarlet flowers appear in clustered racemes with prominent stamens. Originally it came from tropical dry forests of Central America, but it has been extensively grown in tropical areas worldwide as a garden tree.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/phyllocarpus_septentrionalis.htm

Cissus sicyoides, Cissus verticillata, Possum Grape Vine, Princess Vine, Season Vine, Monkey Liana

Cissus sicyoides, Cissus verticillata

Possum Grape Vine, Princess Vine, Season Vine, Monkey Liana
Family: Vitaceae
Origin: Tropical America
Vine or creeperFull sunSemi-shadeModerate waterOrnamental foliageEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.Invasive

Fast growing ornamental vine with woody stems and waxy dark green leaves. Black grape-like fruit are very showy in fall. Medicinal plant popularly known in Brazil as cipo-puca, insulina. The plant is used in several diseases, including rheumatism, epilepsy, stroke and also in the treatment of diabetes. Leaf decoctions of Cissus sicyoides are taken widely as a popular remedy for diabetes mellitus in Brazil, where its common name is vegetal insulin.



Cissus sicyoides, Cissus verticillata, Possum Grape Vine, Princess Vine, Season Vine, Monkey Liana
Cissus sicyoides, Cissus verticillata, Possum Grape Vine, Princess Vine, Season Vine, Monkey Liana


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/cissus_sicyoides.htm

Combretum aubletii, Monkey's brush

Combretum aubletii

Monkey's brush
Family: Combretaceae
Origin: S. America
Large shrub 5-10 ftSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterRed/crimson/vinous flowersDeciduousAttracts butterflies, hummingbirds

Combretums are very impressive plants, and this one is definitely one of the brightest of them. Powder-puff flowers are multi-colored: yellow, orange, and red. When in bloom, this vining shrub is all covered with them, looks like a fire. Can be trimmed as a shrub or grows as a vine with support when you let it go.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/combretum_aubletii.htm
 
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