TROPICAL PLANT ENCYCLOPEDIA


Pictogram Guide · Mouse over pictogram for definition

Number of plants found: 17     Next    Go to page:  1  2

Aloe africana, African Aloe

Aloe africana

African Aloe
Family: Asphodelaceae    (Formerly:Xanthorrhoeaceae)
Subfamily: Asphodeloideae
Origin: South Africa
Small tree 10-20 ftFull sunModerate waterDry conditionsYellow, orange flowersEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.Attracts butterflies, hummingbirdsThorny or spiny

Native to South Africa, it is a small, slow-growing tree of about 10-20 feet in height and width with an attractive trunk with lighter-colored markings and bark. It is an evergreen or semi-evergreen plant with narrow, gray-green leaves that feature white tubercles on their surfaces.

When planted outdoors in the ground, Aloe africana prefers full sun and moderate water during the summers and should be kept dry during the winter months. When grown in a pot, it can be kept outdoors in USDA zones 9-11, or brought indoors and kept in a bright location during the winter months.

The African Aloe blooms an abundance of yellow and orange tubular-shaped flowers during the winter months, making it a very attractive addition to any garden. The blooms attract both butterflies and hummingbirds, and the plant itself is known in ethnomedicine as an essential remedy.

Although Aloe africana is a beautiful plant, it is also somewhat spiny or thorny, and should be handled with caution. When grown in cold regions, the plant should be placed in a pot to protect it from cold temperatures which can cause tissue damage. Make sure to use a well-draining potting soil and containers with drainage holes and avoid overwatering. Place the pot in a sunny location and be sure to fertilize them regularly, and you can enjoy the beauty of African Aloe in your garden!



Aloe africana, African Aloe
Aloe africana, African Aloe


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/aloe_africana.htm

Aloe arborescens, Tree Aloe, Krantz Aloe, Torch Aloe

Aloe arborescens

Tree Aloe, Krantz Aloe, Torch Aloe
Family: Asphodelaceae    (Formerly:Xanthorrhoeaceae)
Subfamily: Asphodeloideae
Origin: South Africa
USDA Zone: 9-11?
USDA Plant Hardiness MapLarge shrub 5-10 ft tallFull sunModerate waterDry conditionsRed, crimson, vinous flowersYellow, orange flowersEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.Attracts butterflies, hummingbirdsThorny or spiny

Tree Aloe is grown mainly as an ornamental or as an accent plant, but is also an excellent and impenetrable hedge plant. Established plants will survive a drought quite well, but for the benefit of the plant, water should be provided.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/aloe_arborescens.htm

Aloe aristata, Torch Plant, Lace Aloe

Aloe aristata

Torch Plant, Lace Aloe
Family: Asphodelaceae    (Formerly:Xanthorrhoeaceae)
Subfamily: Asphodeloideae
Origin: South Africa
USDA Plant Hardiness MapSmall plant 2-5 ftFull sunModerate waterOrnamental foliageThorny or spiny

Small attractive Aloe that looks a lot like a giant Haworthia.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/aloe_aristata.htm

Aloe erinacea, Aloe melanacantha var. erinacea , Goree

Aloe erinacea, Aloe melanacantha var. erinacea

Goree
Family: Asphodelaceae    (Formerly:Xanthorrhoeaceae)
Subfamily: Asphodeloideae
Origin: Namibia
USDA Plant Hardiness MapSmall plant 2-5 ftFull sunModerate waterDry conditionsThorny or spiny

Aloe erinacea, or Goree, is a small plant native to Namibia, that typically ranges between 2 to 5 feet in height. It is a low-growing succulent, with a rosette of fleshy leaves that display a variegated pattern across a blue-green backdrop. The leaves are full of thorns or spines, which gives the plant its unique look and makes it easily distinguishable from other succulents.

This drought-tolerant succulent requires full sun and prefers well-drained, dry soil. It can withstand hot temperature and grows best in USDA Zones 9-11. It requires moderate watering and only needs occasional watering during summer months when the soil is dry. During the winter months, it is recommended to not water at all.

Aloe erinacea is well suited to be grown in containers, with more frequent watering needs. If you are trying to grow this plant in cold regions, you may need to bring the pot indoors in the winter. Keep in mind that Goree prefers to be on the drier side, so don't overwater it. When potting, use a well-drained, arid soil.

The rewards of growing Aloe erinacea are well worth it. Not only does this succulent look beautiful and unique, it is also low maintenance and resistant to pests and diseases. Aloe erinacea can be used to create an eye-catching centerpiece to your succulent garden, or as a focal point in a larger container or planter. With its easy-care nature and colorful foliage, you'll be sure to enjoy this Namibian beauty for years to come.



Aloe erinacea, Aloe melanacantha var. erinacea , Goree
Aloe erinacea, Aloe melanacantha var. erinacea , Goree
Aloe erinacea, Aloe melanacantha var. erinacea , Goree
Aloe erinacea, Aloe melanacantha var. erinacea , Goree


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/aloe_erinacea.htm

Aloe haworthioides, Haworthia-leaved Aloe

Aloe haworthioides

Haworthia-leaved Aloe
Family: Asphodelaceae    (Formerly:Xanthorrhoeaceae)
Subfamily: Asphodeloideae
USDA Plant Hardiness MapSmall plant 2-5 ftFull sunModerate waterRed, crimson, vinous flowers

Aloe haworthioides, Haworthia-leaved Aloe
Aloe haworthioides, Haworthia-leaved Aloe


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/aloe_haworthioides.htm

Aloe juvenna, Tiger Tooth Aloe

Aloe juvenna

Tiger Tooth Aloe
Family: Asphodelaceae    (Formerly:Xanthorrhoeaceae)
Subfamily: Asphodeloideae
Origin: Africa
USDA Plant Hardiness MapSmall plant 2-5 ftFull sunModerate waterDry conditionsThorny or spiny

This attractive aloe is native to Africa and grows up to 2-5 feet high, with a spread of a couple of feet. Its leaves, arranged in a rosette, are short, succulent, bright green and edged with brownish-red spines.

It's easy to care for Aloe juvenna and prefers full sun but accepts light shade, though too much shade will reduce the number of blooms. During the growing season, it likes moderate amounts of water and good drainage. In the winter months, it has the capacity to survive dry conditions, but for the health of the plant, water should be given at least once a month. This plant is hardy to USDA Zone 9-11, but in colder regions, it's best grown in a pot and stored in a cool, dry place, and kept over the winter months in a bright, sunny location, but not in direct sunlight.

In terms of maintenance and care, Aloe juvenna is quite easy to care for. Feed the plant once in spring and again in the early fall with a slow-release granular fertilizer or liquid fertilizer. When repotting or pruning, use gloves to protect your hands due to the sharp leaf spines. To maximize flowering, remove dead flowers as soon as they appear, and snipping off the seed pods will halt self-seeding. In the cold winter months, the pot should be put in a cool and dry place, away from the risk of frost.



Aloe juvenna, Tiger Tooth Aloe
Aloe juvenna, Tiger Tooth Aloe
Aloe juvenna, Tiger Tooth Aloe
Aloe juvenna, Tiger Tooth Aloe


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/aloe_juvenna.htm

Aloe marlothii, Mountain Aloe, Flat-flowered Aloe

Aloe marlothii

Mountain Aloe, Flat-flowered Aloe
Family: Asphodelaceae    (Formerly:Xanthorrhoeaceae)
Subfamily: Asphodeloideae
Origin: South Africa
USDA Plant Hardiness MapLarge shrub 5-10 ft tallFull sunModerate waterDry conditionsYellow, orange flowersAttracts butterflies, hummingbirdsThorny or spiny

Aloe marlothii is a large, perennial, succulent, single-stemmed aloe, usually 2-4 m tall.



Aloe marlothii, Mountain Aloe, Flat-flowered Aloe
Aloe marlothii, Mountain Aloe, Flat-flowered Aloe
Aloe marlothii, Mountain Aloe, Flat-flowered Aloe
Aloe marlothii, Mountain Aloe, Flat-flowered Aloe


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/aloe_marlothii.htm

Aloe plicatilis, Fan Aloe

Aloe plicatilis

Fan Aloe
Family: Asphodelaceae    (Formerly:Xanthorrhoeaceae)
Subfamily: Asphodeloideae
Origin: South Africa
USDA Zone: 9-12?
USDA Plant Hardiness MapLarge shrub 5-10 ft tallFull sunModerate waterRed, crimson, vinous flowersYellow, orange flowers

The Aloe plicatilis grows in an area with a high winter rainfall. Fan Aloe is grown mainly as an ornamental or as an accent plant, but is also an excellent and impenetrable hedge plant.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/aloe_plicatilis.htm

Aloe sp., Aloe
Aloe dorotheae

Aloe sp.

Aloe
Family: Asphodelaceae    (Formerly:Xanthorrhoeaceae)
Subfamily: Asphodeloideae
Origin: Africa, Madagascar and The Arabian Peninsula
USDA Plant Hardiness MapSmall plant 2-5 ftFull sunSemi-shadeModerate waterDry conditionsPink flowersWhite, off-white flowersOrnamental foliageRed, crimson, vinous flowersYellow, orange flowersEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.Attracts butterflies, hummingbirdsThorny or spinySubtropical, mature plant cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

They range in size from little one inch miniatures to massive plant colonies consisting of hundreds of 2 foot diameter plants. Although most Aloes have some medicinal or commercial value, the most commonly known is the Aloe barbadensis... better known as Aloe vera. All Aloes are semitropical succulent plants, and may only be grown outdoors in areas where there is no chance of freezing (USDA zones 10-11). However, they make excellent house plants when they are given sufficient light. Potted Aloes benefit from spending the summer outdoors. Older specimens may even bloom, producing a tall stock covered with bright colored coral flowers. Aloe flower nectar is a favorite of hummingbirds! The medicinal properties of Aloe vera have been known, and recorded since biblical times. It has been used for a variety of ailments, and as an ointment for burns, cuts, and rashes, as well as an ingredient in various beauty preparations. The sap of the Aloe is a thick, mucilaginous gel. It is this gel which is used medicinally. Because Aloe plants consist of 95% water, they are extremely frost tender. If they are grown outdoors in warm climates, they should be planted in full sun, or light shade. The soil should be moderately fertile, and fast draining. Established plants will survive a drought quite well, but for the benefit of the plant, water should be provided. During the winter months, the plant will become somewhat dormant, and utilize very little moisture. During this period watering should be minimal. Allow the soil to become completely dry before giving the plant a cup or two of water. During the summer months, the soil should be completely soaked, but then be allowed to dry again before re-watering. Aloes have a shallow, spreading root system, so when it is time to repot choose a wide planter, rather than a deep one. You may also use a packaged 'cacti mix' soil. Aloes are propagated by removing the offsets which are produced around the base of mature plants, when they are a couple inches tall (or larger). They may also be grown from seed.

Species and varieties:

Aloe africana

Aloe albiflora

Aloe amudatensis

Aloe arborescens

Aloe aristata

Aloe bakeri

Aloe barberae

Aloe bellatula

Aloe branddraaiensis

Aloe brevifolia

Aloe buhrii

Aloe cameronii

Aloe camperi

Aloe ciliaris

Aloe cremnophila

Aloe dichotoma

Aloe 'Delta Lights'

Aloe dorotheae

Aloe dyeri

Aloe erinacea

Aloe ferox

Aloe gariepensis

Aloe glauca

Aloe haworthioides

Aloe hereroensis

Aloe humilis

Aloe juvenna

Aloe karasbergensis

Aloe krapohliana

Aloe macrosiphon

Aloe marlothii

Aloe melanacantha

Aloe microstigma

Aloe mitriformis

Aloe perryi

Aloe pearsonii

Aloe pictifolia

Aloe plicatilis

Aloe pruinosa

Aloe ramosissima

Aloe saponaria

Aloe somaliensis

Aloe speciosa

Aloe squarrosa

Aloe striata

Aloe vera

Aloe x nobilis





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/aloe_sp.htm

Aloe speciosa, Tilt-head Aloe

Aloe speciosa

Tilt-head Aloe
Family: Asphodelaceae    (Formerly:Xanthorrhoeaceae)
Subfamily: Asphodeloideae
Origin: South Africa
USDA Plant Hardiness MapLarge shrub 5-10 ft tallFull sunModerate waterRed, crimson, vinous flowersAttracts butterflies, hummingbirdsThorny or spiny

The rosettes of Aloe speciosa are often tilted to one side, to allow the plant to obtain the maximum amount of light. In the southern hemisphere, the tilt is usually towards the north, and in the northern hemisphere, towards the south, but a plant growing in a shady position would tilt its head in the direction that it receives the most light, which is not necessarily the north/south.



Aloe speciosa, Tilt-head Aloe
Aloe speciosa, Tilt-head Aloe
Aloe speciosa, Tilt-head Aloe


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/aloe_speciosa.htm
 
Next


Use link to repeat this search:
https://toptropicals.com/cgi-bin/garden_catalog/cat.cgi?find=Aloe&search_op=and&keyword_op=and&language=e&number=10
&no_change_lang=1&user=tt&sale=1&first=0