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TROPICAL PLANT CATALOG Printer friendly page  

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Phyllostachys nigra, Black Bamboo

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 Phyllostachys nigra
Family: Poaceae   (Formerly:Poaceae / Gramineae)
Subfamily: Bambusoideae
Black Bamboo
Origin: South China
Large shrub 5-10 ftFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterOrnamental foliageSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

With jet black culms and feathery green leaves, this is perhaps our most sought after bamboo. Under ideal conditions Black Bamboo will grow to 35 feet in height with culms over 2 inches in diameter, but 25 feet is its average height in most climates. New culms emerge green every spring and gradually turn black in one to three years. There is always a contrast of light and dark culms balanced by slender, dark green leaves. This bamboo is initially slow to spread, through when mature, it can be quite vigorous. If planted in poor soil it tends to grow in a tight cluster, producing mostly thin, weepy culms. P. nigra should be given a generous layer of rich topsoil, composed of compost or aged manure and mulch, and space to grow unimpeded. It makes an outstanding specimen, if well cared for, and can be the focal point of any garden. It can also be shaped to form a dense hedge for privacy. Black Bamboo and P. nigra 'Bory' are among the most prized bamboos for decorative wood working. Both will retain their dark or mottled colors when dried.

USDA Zone recommended 7 through 10.


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 Phyllostachys nigra, Black Bamboo

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Phyllostachys nigra, Black Bamboo

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Phyllostachys nigra, Black Bamboo

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Phyllostachys nigra, Black Bamboo

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Phyllostachys nigra, Black Bamboo

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Phyllostachys nigra, Black Bamboo

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Young plant


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With jet black culms and feathery green leaves, this is perhaps our most sought after bamboo. New culms emerge green every spring and gradually turn black in one to three years. There is always a contrast of light and dark culms balanced by slender, dark green leaves. This bamboo is initially slow to spread, through when mature, it can be quite vigorous. P. nigra should be given a generous layer of rich topsoil, composed of compost or aged manure and mulch, and space to grow unimpeded. It makes an outstanding specimen, if well cared for, and can be the focal point of any garden. It can also be shaped to form a dense hedge for privacy. Black Bamboo and P. nigra 'Bory' are among the most prized bamboos for decorative wood working. Both will retain their dark or mottled colors when dried. USDA Zone recommended 7 through 10.This item is certified for shipping to California.
California certification

Most of our plants are certified for shipping to California, however, certain plants are not certified. Please do not order not-certified plants to California addresses. These plants may be added to CA certification in the future; please contact us for more information.



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Grown in 10"/3 gal pot

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