TROPICAL PLANT ENCYCLOPEDIA


Pictogram Guide · Mouse over pictogram for definition

Number of plants found: 64     Next    Go to page:  1  2  3  4  5  Last  

Aegle marmelos, Bael, Bengal Quince, Indian Bael, Wood Apple, Matoom

Aegle marmelos

Bael, Bengal Quince, Indian Bael, Wood Apple, Matoom
Family: Rutaceae
Origin: India
Big tree taller than 20 ftSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeModerate waterFragrantEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.EdibleThorny or spinyUltra tropical, minimal temperature 55F

This plant is a medium sized tree that grows up to 40ft.This plant is known to posses some medicinal properties. All parts of this tree including, the roots, leaves, trunk, fruits, and seeds, are used for curing one human ailment, or another. The fruits are usually eaten by people.They taste like marmalade, and smell like roses. They are also used in the preparation of many medicines in villages. These protein-rich fruits are also used in making some very good drinks. They can also make a wonderful jam. The plant easily withstands long periods of drought, which are needed for better fruit yields. It grows in most soil and climate types, and requires little care when established.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/aegle_marmelos.htm

Agathosma gonaquensis, Gonaqua Buchu

Agathosma gonaquensis

Gonaqua Buchu
Family: Rutaceae
Origin: Southern Africa
Groundcover and low-growing 2ftSmall plant 2-5 ftFull sunModerate waterDry conditionsWhite, off-white flowersFragrantEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.

This plant is low-lying, compact, rounded and spreading. It produces masses of white flowers, and the natural oils within its leaves produce a pleasant fragrance when the foliage is crushed or handled. Once established, it withstands both drought and frost.




Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/agathosma_gonaquensis.htm

Atalantia monophylla, Limonia monophylla, Indian Atalantia, Wild Lime

Atalantia monophylla, Limonia monophylla

Indian Atalantia, Wild Lime
Family: Rutaceae
Origin: Southeast Asia
Can be used for bonsaiLarge shrub 5-10 ft tallSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterModerate waterWhite, off-white flowersFragrantEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.Attracts butterflies, hummingbirds

Atalantia monophylla, Limonia monophylla, Indian Atalantia, Wild Lime
Atalantia monophylla, Limonia monophylla, Indian Atalantia, Wild Lime


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/atalantia_monophylla.htm

Boronia sp., Boronia

Boronia sp.

Boronia
Family: Rutaceae
Origin: Australia
Large shrub 5-10 ft tallFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterPink flowers

Boronias are known for their perfumed flowers, they are generally somewhat difficult to grow in cultivation. All species require excellent drainage and part shade.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/boronia_sp.htm

Casimiroa edulis, White Sapote
Flowering in 1 gal pot

Casimiroa edulis

White Sapote
Family: Rutaceae
Origin: Central America
Big tree taller than 20 ftFull sunModerate waterEdibleSubtropical, mature plant cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

Very tasty custard-like pulp melts in your mouth. Flavor is excellent. Reputed in Mexico to have soporific effect. Sapote dormil - Sleepy Sapote. Varieties: Homestead, Dade. Fruiting Season: May - July. Thin skinned fruit does not ship well.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/casimiroa_edulis.htm

Choisya 'Aztec Pearl', Mexican Orange Blossom

Choisya 'Aztec Pearl'

Mexican Orange Blossom
Family: Rutaceae
Origin: Mexico
Large shrub 5-10 ft tallFull sunSemi-shadeModerate waterWhite, off-white flowersFragrantAttracts butterflies, hummingbirdsSubtropical, mature plant cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

The Choisya ternata has hybridised with Choisya arizonica to give Choisya 'Aztec Pearl', a popular modern cultivar, which has leaves divided into 3-5 slender leaflets, and flowers which are pink in bud, opening white.This is a rounded, medium-sized shrub with shining, dark green leaves. These are opposite; they are pitted with numerous oil glands (which can be seen if the leaf is held up to the light) and give off a pungent odor when crushed. Happy in full sun or dappled shade, it will also do well in dry areas. Best planted in early autumn or wait until spring. If pruning required, then it should be done in mid spring.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/choisya_aztec_pearl.htm

Choisya ternata , Mexican Orange Blossom

Choisya ternata

Mexican Orange Blossom
Family: Rutaceae
Origin: Mexico
Large shrub 5-10 ft tallSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunRegular waterModerate waterWhite, off-white flowersFragrantAttracts butterflies, hummingbirdsSubtropical, mature plant cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

Choisya ternata is a fast growing little shrub that is perfect for a mixed shrub hedge or border.

The Choisya ternata has hybridised with Choisya arizonica to give Choisya 'Aztec Pearl', a popular modern cultivar.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/choisya_ternata.htm

Citrofortunella mitis, Calamondin, Calamondin Orange, China Orange, Musk Lime, Panama Orange, Philippine Orange, To-kumquat

Citrofortunella mitis

Calamondin, Calamondin Orange, China Orange, Musk Lime, Panama Orange, Philippine Orange, To-kumquat
Family: Rutaceae
Small tree 10-20 ftFull sunRegular waterWhite, off-white flowersEdible

The calamondin tree, ranging from 6 1/2 to 25 ft (2-7.5 m) high, is erect, slender, often quite cylindrical, densely branched beginning close to the ground, slightly thorny, and develops an extraordinarily deep taproot. Calamondin halves or quarters may be served with iced tea, seafood and meats, to be squeezed for the acid juice. They were commonly so used in Florida before limes became plentiful. Some people boil the sliced fruits with cranberries to make a tart sauce. Calamondins are also preserved whole in sugar sirup, or made into sweet pickles, or marmalade. A superior marmalade is made by using equal quantities of calamondins and kumquats. In Hawaii, a calamondin-papaya marmalade is popular. In Malaya, the calamondin is an ingredient in chutney. Whole fruits, fried in coconut oil with various seasonings, are eaten with curry. The preserved peel is added as flavoring to other fruits stewed or preserved. The juice is primarily valued for making acid beverages. It is often employed like lime or lemon juice to make gelatin salads or desserts, custard pie or chiffon pie. In the Philippines, the extracted juice, with the addition of gum tragacanth as an emulsifier, is pasteurized and bottled commercially. This product must be stored at low temperature to keep well. Pectin is recovered from the peel as a by-product of juice production.



Citrofortunella mitis, Calamondin, Calamondin Orange, China Orange, Musk Lime, Panama Orange, Philippine Orange, To-kumquat


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/citrofortunella_mitis.htm

Citrofortunella sp., Calamondin
Citrofortunella x microcarpa

Citrofortunella sp.

Calamondin
Family: Rutaceae
USDA Zone: 8-10?
USDA Plant Hardiness MapCan be used for bonsaiLarge shrub 5-10 ft tallSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeModerate waterWhite, off-white flowersFragrantEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.Attracts butterflies, hummingbirdsEdibleSubtropical, mature plant cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

Citrofortunella sp., also known as Calamondin, is a bi-generic hybrid Citrus aurantifolia x Fortunella sp that is commonly used in bonsai cultivation. It is an evergreen, frost-tender tree that can reach heights of 5-10 feet as a shrub or 10-20 feet as a small tree. The plant boasts fragrant, white to off-white flowers that attract both butterflies and hummingbirds, as well as abundant fruit that can be consumed fresh or cooked.

Not only is the fruit of Calamondin edible, but it also possesses a wide range of ethnomedical properties, including antiseptic, antifungal, expectorant, and carminative uses. With proper care, the mature plant can tolerate temperatures as low as 20 degrees Fahrenheit for short periods of time and is hardy in USDA zones 8-11. It has the potential to produce many fruits per growing season and is rich in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.

The ideal growing conditions for Calamondin include well-draining, moist soil in full sun. The plant prefers a very sunny position. It is important to neither overwater or underwater the plant, as too much or too little water can cause yellowing and death.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/citrofortunella_sp.htm

Citrus aurantifolia, Mexican Lime, Key lime, West Indian lime

Citrus aurantifolia

Mexican Lime, Key lime, West Indian lime
Family: Rutaceae
USDA Plant Hardiness MapSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeModerate waterWhite, off-white flowersFragrantEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.Attracts butterflies, hummingbirdsEdibleThorny or spinySubtropical, mature plant cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

It is a small tree, 10-20 ft. tall. This plant must have full sun to partial shade, with moderate water needs. It is cold hardy to at least 30sF for a short time. This plant has fragrant, off-white flowers that attract butterflies and hummingbirds. The fruit is edible and highly valued for its sourness. The fruit is round and can be green or yellow depending on when it is picked. It can produce up to four fruits in one season.

Citrus aurantifolia (Mexican Lime) has many useful properties. Its fruit has many healthy benefits, as it contains vitamin C, calcium and other minerals that are thought to prevent some types of cancer, as well as support strong bones, teeth, and skin. It is also used for its therapeutic properties, as it can be used to help with constipation, digestive problems, and infections. The juice is often used to enhance the flavor of food and drinks, and the essential oils are used in perfumes, cosmetics and soaps.

This small tree can be grown in USDA Zone 9-11, and prefers full sun to semi-shade. It does not need significant water beyond occasional deep-watering. The tree's spiny branches offer protection from animals and make it an appropriate choice for a hedgerow.

While fruit production is abundant in the warm months of May to September, the Mexican Lime is also known to be hardy in cold climates - surviving temperatures down to 30sF for a short time. C. aurantifolia can produce up to four fruits in a season. To get the best harvest, the plant needs to be regularly pruned, watered, and fertilized. The plant also needs to be protected from frost during the coldest months, which can be done using an insulating fabric, specifically designed for this kind of climate.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/citrus_aurantifolia.htm
 
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