TROPICAL PLANT ENCYCLOPEDIA


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Botanical family: Burseraceae

Number of plants found: 20     Next    Go to page:  1  2

Boswellia papyrifera, Boswellia

Boswellia papyrifera

Boswellia
Family: Burseraceae
Origin: Northeastern Africa
USDA Zone: 10-12?
USDA Plant Hardiness MapSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunDry conditionsModerate waterDeciduous plantEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.

Boswellia papyrifera, Boswellia


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/boswellia_papyrifera.htm

Boswellia sacra, Boswellia carteri, Boswellia undulato crenata, Frankincense, Olibanum Tree

Boswellia sacra, Boswellia carteri, Boswellia undulato crenata

Frankincense, Olibanum Tree
Family: Burseraceae
Origin: Northeastern Africa
USDA Zone: 10-12?
USDA Plant Hardiness MapPlant with caudexSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunDry conditionsModerate waterYellow, orange flowersDeciduous plantEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.

Boswellia sacra is the primary tree in the genus Boswellia from which frankincense, a resinous dried sap, is harvested.

Boswellia sacra is a tree with papery, peeling bark and leaves clustered at the ends of tangled branches. It has compound leaves and an odd number of leaflets, which grow opposite to one another along its branches. Its tiny flowers, a yellowish white, are gathered in axillary clusters composed of five petals, ten stamens and a cup with five teeth. Boswellia Sacra trees are considered unusual for their ability to grow in environments so unforgiving that they sometimes grow out of solid rock. The initial means of attachment to the rock is unknown but is accomplished by a bulbous disk-like swelling of the trunk.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/boswellia_sacra.htm

Boswellia sp., Boswellia. Boswellia nana
Boswellia nana

Boswellia sp.

Boswellia
Family: Burseraceae
Origin: Tropical Africa
USDA Plant Hardiness MapPlant with caudexSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunDry conditionsModerate waterUnusual colorDeciduous plantEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.

Boswellia is a genus of trees in the order Sapindales, known for their fragrant resin which has many pharmacological uses. Boswellia sacra is the primary tree in the genus Boswellia from which frankincense, a resinous dried sap, is harvested.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/boswellia_sp.htm

Bursera fagaroides, Elephant Tree, Fragrant Bursera

Bursera fagaroides

Elephant Tree, Fragrant Bursera
Family: Burseraceae
Origin: Northwestern Mexico to southern Arizona
USDA Zone: 9-10?
USDA Plant Hardiness MapPlant with caudexPlant used for bonsaiLarge shrub 5-10 ft tallSmall plant 2-5 ftFull sunDry conditionsModerate waterOrnamental foliageDeciduous plantFragrant plant

A shrub or small tree, widespreading, with a very short, thick, trunk. Develops a swollen trunk, and can be a spectacular specimen. Flower is small, creamy white, borne on long stalks, may be clustered or solitary. Bark is tight and smooth, very attractive, reddish brown and peeling to reveal gray-green. Drought deciduous. Leaves have distinct citrus odor when crushed. Great ready bonsai! The fruit is brown maturing in late fall. The seeds are red, and germinate quite easily. The dried sap of some of the species sold as frankincense.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/bursera_fagaroides.htm

Bursera hindsiana, Copal, Torote Prieto

Bursera hindsiana

Copal, Torote Prieto
Family: Burseraceae
Origin: Western Mexico
USDA Zone: 9-10?
USDA Plant Hardiness MapPlant with caudexPlant used for bonsaiSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunDry conditionsModerate waterFragrant plant

Leaves drought deciduous, serrate, to 2 inches, occasionally trifoliate, aromatic when crushed. Great plant for bonsai.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/bursera_hindsiana.htm

Bursera microphylla, Elephant Tree, Torote Colorado, Copal

Bursera microphylla

Elephant Tree, Torote Colorado, Copal
Family: Burseraceae
Origin: Southern California, Mexico
USDA Zone: 9-11?
USDA Plant Hardiness MapPlant with caudexPlant used for bonsaiSmall tree 10-20 ftSemi-shadeFull sunModerate waterDeciduous plantEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.Fragrant plant

It can be used as a bonsai specimen and can be grown in USDA Zone 9-11. It makes an attractive, small tree that is 10-20 ft tall.

The Elephant Tree is a beautiful, deciduous plant that is native to Southern California and Mexico. Its distinct feature is its swollen, succulent caudex and a tall, twisting trunk that gives it the appearance of a miniature Elephant. Its pinnate leaves are fragrant and have a strong scent of camphor.

The Elephant Tree can thrive in full sun and semi-shade. It prefers moderate water. Despite its capacity to withstand droughts, it must not be kept constantly dry or moist for too long. The plant is especially useful for xeriscaping or for adding flavor to a garden. It is sure to be a standout in all types of landscapes.

It can be used as a bonsai specimen, as its propensity for drought resistance enables it to withstand harsh growing conditions. For bonsai enthusiasts, the Elephant Tree offers a truly unique addition to the garden.

The Elephant Tree is a popular ethnomedical plant with immense potential in healing and treating symptoms. Its roots and leaves are used as a source of medicinal compounds, such as Gum Burseran, a type of resin extracted from its bark.

Growing the Elephant Tree in a pot in cold regions is possible. However, the plant must be kept warm during the colder months. It should be placed in a sunny location to provide the light and heat it needs. The soil should be kept moist, and the plant should be fertilized every two months. To guarantee its survival, it is recommended to use a thick layer of mulch to protect the roots and to ensure they don't get too dry during winter. Moreover, potted specimens must be ensured that they don't experience great fluctuations in temperature.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/bursera_microphylla.htm

Bursera morelensis, Red Cuajiote

Bursera morelensis

Red Cuajiote
Family: Burseraceae
Origin: Mexico
USDA Zone: 9-11?
USDA Plant Hardiness MapPlant used for bonsaiSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunModerate waterDeciduous plantEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.

Bursera morelensis, native to Mexico and Guatemala, is an ethnomedical plant with healing properties. It is prized for its extraordinary color and can be used for bonsai. The pinnate leaves are aromatic with a strong scent of camphor.

This small evergreen tree grows to a maximum height of 10-20 ft. It needs full sun and moderate water. It is a deciduous plant and must be protected during winter in cold regions. It is hardy in USDA Zone 9-11.

In cold areas, Bursera morelensis can be grown in a container and protected by keeping it indoors during the coldest months. The plant should be watered regularly, but the amount of water should be limited and the soil should be allowed to dry between waterings. It should be fed with a balanced liquid fertilizer once or twice a month during the growing season. During winter, water should be limited even further.

In its natural environment, Bursera morelensis is able to self-propagate. When it grows in a pot, however, propagation is more difficult. If one wants to propagate it, it is best to propagate from cuttings from laterite or coral sand and cuttings will usually root in two to four weeks. Once the cuttings have rooted, they can be transplanted into the ground or into larger containers.

The Bursera morelensis is incredibly easy to grow and care for, and is a great choice for anyone looking to add a splash of color to their outdoor space. In addition it is a highly valued ethnomedical plant, with many healing properties that have been prized since ancient times.



Bursera morelensis, Red Cuajiote
Bursera morelensis, Red Cuajiote
Bursera morelensis, Red Cuajiote


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/bursera_morelensis.htm

Bursera odorata, Torote Blanco, Elephant Tree

Bursera odorata

Torote Blanco, Elephant Tree
Family: Burseraceae
Origin: Mexico
USDA Zone: 9-11?
USDA Plant Hardiness MapPlant used for bonsaiSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunModerate waterDeciduous plantFragrant plant

Bursera odorata, Torote Blanco, Elephant Tree
Bursera odorata, Torote Blanco, Elephant Tree
Bursera odorata, Torote Blanco, Elephant Tree


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/bursera_odorata.htm

Bursera schlechtendalii

Bursera schlechtendalii

Family: Burseraceae
Origin: Mexico
USDA Zone: 9?
USDA Plant Hardiness MapPlant with caudexPlant used for bonsaiLarge shrub 5-10 ft tallFull sunModerate waterYellow, orange flowersEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.

Bursera schlechtendalii is a tuberous shrub or tree. This woody succulent has smooth bark that flacks off in layers when growing. It can grow to about five feet. The branches are silvery, dark-grey and have small, unifoliate leaves that group at the apex




Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/bursera_schlechtendalii.htm

Bursera simaruba, Gumbo-Limbo, West Indian Birch, Tourist Tree

Bursera simaruba

Gumbo-Limbo, West Indian Birch, Tourist Tree
Family: Burseraceae
Origin: Central America, West Indies
USDA Zone: 10-11?
USDA Plant Hardiness MapBig tree taller than 20 ftSemi-shadeFull sunModerate waterDeciduous plantSeaside, salt tolerant plant

Very fast growing, tolerant of salt and calcareous soils, the Bursera simaruba, with its attractive shiny red exfoliating bark, makes a beautiful specimen tree in a mild coastal location. Massive trunk with attractive reddish peeling bark, showing a gray underbark.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/bursera_simaruba.htm
 
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