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Zingiber officinale, Spice Ginger, Edible Ginger, Common Ginger, Cooking Ginger, Canton Ginger, Halia

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 Zingiber officinale
Family: Zingiberaceae
Spice Ginger, Edible Ginger, Common Ginger, Cooking Ginger, Canton Ginger, Halia
Origin: tropical Asia
Small shrub 2-5 ftShadeSemi-shadeRegular waterOrnamental foliageYellow/orange flowersFragrantEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.DeciduousSpice or herbEdibleSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

This ginger has tall, erect stems with narrow leaves, this basal bloomer produces green cones that turn red when mature. It is a herbaceous perennial with upright stems and narrow medium green leaves arranged in two ranks on each stem. Ginger grows from an aromatic tuberlike rhizome (underground stem) which is warty and branched. The inflorescence grows on a separate stem from the foliage stem, and forms a dense spike. The bracts are green with translucent margins and the small flowers are yellow green with purple lips and cream colored blotches. Most of edible gingers in cultivation are sterile cultivars grown for the edible rhizome, and the flower is rarely seen. Ginger is often grown in a container and brought indoors in winter when water and light are reduced and the plant is allowed to "rest." Common cooking gingers are rarely found in garden centers as potted plants because they do not have much ornamental value. Plant this ginger in the garden to produce your own fresh ginger.


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 Zingiber officinale, Spice Ginger, Edible Ginger, Common Ginger, Cooking Ginger, Canton Ginger, Halia

Click to see full-size image

Zingiber officinale, Spice Ginger, Edible Ginger, Common Ginger, Cooking Ginger, Canton Ginger, Halia

Click to see full-size image
Zingiber officinale, Spice Ginger, Edible Ginger, Common Ginger, Cooking Ginger, Canton Ginger, Halia

Click to see full-size image

Steve
Suffolk, VA
USDA Zone:8
7 Dec 2016
Would be much more helpful to show the hardiness zone for this plant than the thermometer symbol. Will it make it in zone 8?
Stephen B. Clayton
Largo, FL USA
USDA Zone:9b
19 Jun 2008
I should have mentioned that Edible Ginger has a distinctive gingery smell to the leaves. Rub your fingers on the leaves and smell them - they should smell like ginger.

I don't think the ornamental Gingers have that same smell, at least none of the many ornamental varieties my Mom grows have it. Only Edible Ginger.

Best way to determine if your Ginger is edible is to know your plants and trust your growers!
Stephen B. Clayton
Largo, FL USA
USDA Zone:9b
19 Jun 2008
Edible Ginger (Zingiber officinale) is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED! :-)

Easy to grow: 4.5 stars
Food usage: 5.0 stars
Ornamental: 2.5 stars
Tolerates salt: 3.0 stars
Tolerates drought: 2.0 stars
Cold: 2.5 stars
(My Mom has plants that survived 28 degrees. I don't know otherwise. Hey, I live in Florida, remember?)

Exposure: Full Sun in cooler areas, otherwise Partial Sun to Shade. Best grown as an "understory" plant, underneath trees or tall plants where some shade can be provided.

Very easy to grow in moderately rich, well drained soil. I find it is best grown in partial shade, as the hot Florida sun dries out the leaves rapidly.

The way I plant it is first, soak the rhizomes in water overnight, then second, cut the rhizomes into pieces of around one-and-a-half to two inches size, making sure each piece has at least one "bud" or "eye" on it. The buds can be placed laying down or pointing up as needed.

Keep moist, but not soggy. Rhizomes ("roots") on my plants double or triple in size per season. Non-hybrid, so save some "roots" for replanting. Perennial, but my experience is that replanting yearly (or at least every 2 years) yields the freshest tasting rhizomes. I dig the roots during the year, but I think they are best right before the foliage dies back in the Fall. (Some plants do not die back - mine do.) Older roots tend to be a bit tough and fibrous.

Edible Ginger seldom blooms, and if it does, the flowers are usually small and pale blue/violet - the "red bloom on a cone" type listed on this page is an ornamental, "Pine Cone Ginger", and I believe it is not edible. Could be wrong, though...

This stuff is GREAT! Grow it wet to keep the flavor mild, or keep it a little drier for a hotter flavor. Dried Ginger will be slightly hotter than fresh. Grind it, fry it, dry it, candy it, make teas, marinades, dressings and sauces with it, add it to salads, fish, vegetables, pork, chicken, beef, lamb - you can even make a *fine* tasting ginger ale with this stuff, and I mean the GOOD ginger ale like your grandparents used to make - there's nothing like it on the store shelves! I even found a recipe online for Ginger Ice Cream!

Edible ginger is also great for motion sickness, sea sickness, nausea and useful for those with morning sickness - great for settling queasy tummies!

One of humanity's oldest spices - try some!


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Spice Ginger, Cooking Ginger - Plant this ginger in the garden to produce your own fresh ginger. This plant is deciduous, leaves die back in winter and grow back in spring.
RECOMMENDED FERTILIZERS:
Broad Leaf Plus - Ginger-Heliconia-Banana Booster
Tropical Allure - Smart-Release Booster
This item is certified for shipping to California.
California certification

Most of our plants are certified for shipping to California, however, certain plants are not certified. Please do not order not-certified plants to California addresses. These plants may be added to CA certification in the future; please contact us for more information.



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Grown in 6"/1 gal pot

10 Plants in stock

$27.00

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