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rare plants - fragrant flowers - exotic fruit

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rare plants - fragrant flowers - exotic fruit

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TROPICAL PLANT CATALOG Printer friendly page  

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Cola sp., Cola Nut, Kola, Guru Nut

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Cola acuminata seeds
 Cola sp.
Family: Malvaceae
Subfamily: Sterculioideae
Cola Nut, Kola, Guru Nut
Origin: West Africa
Big tree > 20 ftFull sunRegular waterEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.EdibleUltra tropical, min. temperature 55F

A medium sized tree from 40-60ft tall. The flowers are greenish-yellow or white and purple at the margins of the petals. Both male and perfect flowers are produced on the same inflorescence. The fruit is a follicle, which is corky or rough on the surface and may be 8 inches (20 cm) in length.
Cola nuts are seed pods of the plant harvested primarily from the species Cola nitida and Cola acuminata. Cola acuminata fruit may contain several seeds, cola nitida - just one. Cola nuts are chewed for the stimulating effect of the alkaloids caffein and theobrominethey contain. The cola nut is widely grown in West Africa and has particular uses in the social life and religious customs of the people. In Nigeria and Cameroon, four species of cola with edible seed have been distinguished. Cola extract is what gives their names to cola drinks. Will grow in full sun or part shade. It is not hardy and will be injured or killed by frost. Water regularly, as the plant thrives in wet, humid environments. The cola nut is usually propagated by seeds but can be propagated by cuttings.


Similar plants:

 Cola sp., Cola Nut, Kola, Guru Nut

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Cola acuminata seedling

Cola sp., Cola Nut, Kola, Guru Nut

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Cola sp., Cola Nut, Kola, Guru Nut

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Cola sp., Cola Nut, Kola, Guru Nut

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Cola cauliflora seeds
Cola sp., Cola Nut, Kola, Guru Nut

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Cola sp., Cola Nut, Kola, Guru Nut

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Cola nut, Guru Nut - rare exotic nut tree, extremely popular in the tropics as a caffeine-containing stimulant.
RECOMMENDED FERTILIZER:
SUNSHINE C-Cibus - Crop Nutrition Booster
SUNSHINE-Honey - sugar booster
This item is not certified for shipping to California.
California certification

Most of our plants are certified for shipping to California, however, certain plants are not certified. Please do not order not-certified plants to California addresses. These plants may be added to CA certification in the future; please contact us for more information. Plant shipping to California requires a phytosanitary certificate. Its cost is included in S&H
This item ordered for California shipping will be cancelled and up to 3% cancellation fee charged.



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Grown in 6"/1 gal pot

4 plants in stock

$99.00  
Sale: $79.00

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