TROPICAL PLANT CATALOG


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Blighia sapida, Cupania sapida, Akee, Seso Vegetal, Arbre a Fricasser (Haiti)

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Blighia sapida, Cupania sapida
Family: Sapindaceae
Akee, Seso Vegetal, Arbre a Fricasser (Haiti)
Origin: West tropical Africa - Gold Coast & Ivory Coast
Big tree > 20 ftFull sunModerate waterAttracts butterflies, hummingbirdsEdibleSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

Season: May fruit twice a year, heaviest crop in summer. National fruit of Jamaica. Rather large, handsome, fast growing, evergreen tree, may be kept at a reasonable height through regular pruning. When fully mature the fruit opens revealing a crisp, cream colored, glossy aril, somewhat nutty-flavored attached to large, black, shiny seeds. Fruit is poisonous until allowed to open naturally. Makes a very tasty side dish: boil for five minutes and fry in butter. The plant is somewhat hardy to light frost.

Read the story about this plant.




Larry Lool M.D.
Clovis, California
USDA Zone:9
22 Apr 2009
I served in Ghana, West Africa, for several years as a missionary physician. In the front yard of the home in which we lived were several medium size Akee "apple" trees. The bright red-colored fruit that hung on the trees were very attractive, but, we never tasted them because they were reputed to be poisonous. In fact a few times each year young children were brought to our hospital after eating Akee apples. Most were unconscious when brought in to our hospital. Our staff, however, had learned that ingestion of these fruit produced profound hypoglycemia. Conventional treatment with IV glucose solutions saved most of the children - an occasional one with severe hypoglycemia died.
Larry Lool M.D.
Clovis, California
USDA Zone:9
22 Apr 2009
I served in Ghana, West Africa, for several years as a missionary physician. In the front yard of the home in which we lived were several medium size Akee "apple" trees. The bright red-colored fruit that hung on the trees were very attractive, but, we never tasted them because they were reputed to be poisonous. In fact a few times each year young children were brought to our hospital after eating Akee apples. Most were unconscious when brought in to our hospital. Our staff, however, had learned that ingestion of these fruit produced profound hypoglycemia. Conventional treatment with IV glucose solutions saved most of the children - an occasional one with severe hypoglycemia died.
Orville
Saint Petersburg Florida
USDA Zone:10
27 May 2008
Kew is in England. The ackee tree was brought to Jamaica,or some say the seeds, by William Bligh. He then introduced the plant to the British Botanical Society which is in Kew England. The plant was named in his honor Blighia sapida.


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/blighia_sapida.htm

Blighia sapida - Akee 

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Akee - rare fruit tree, hard to find National fruit...  more
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This item is certified for shipping to California.
Grown in
10"/3 gal pot
In stock
$47.95