TROPICAL PLANT ENCYCLOPEDIA


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Number of plants found: 80    Prev  Next    Go to page:  First  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  Last  

Lecythis zabucajo , Monkey Pot, Sapucaia, Sapukaina, Sapucai Nut, Paradise Nut

Lecythis zabucajo

Monkey Pot, Sapucaia, Sapukaina, Sapucai Nut, Paradise Nut
Family: Lecythidaceae
Origin: South America
Big tree > 20 ftSmall tree 10-20 ftSemi-shadeRegular waterDeciduousEdibleUltra tropical, min. temperature 55F

Slow growing tree bearing large fruits up to a foot in diameter, yields the delicious sapucaia nuts. Its bark separates into thin sheets, like paper, used by the natives for cigarette wrappers. Very rare and hard to get plant.



Lecythis zabucajo , Monkey Pot, Sapucaia, Sapukaina, Sapucai Nut, Paradise Nut
Lecithis sp.
Lecythis zabucajo , Monkey Pot, Sapucaia, Sapukaina, Sapucai Nut, Paradise Nut
Lecythis zabucajo , Monkey Pot, Sapucaia, Sapukaina, Sapucai Nut, Paradise Nut
Lecythis zabucajo , Monkey Pot, Sapucaia, Sapukaina, Sapucai Nut, Paradise Nut


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/lecythis_zabucajo.htm

Litsea garciae, Lepidadenia kawakamii, Litsea kawakamii, Tetradenia kawakamii, Engkala

Litsea garciae, Lepidadenia kawakamii, Litsea kawakamii, Tetradenia kawakamii

Engkala
Family: Lauraceae
Origin: Southeast Asia
Small tree 10-20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterEdibleUltra tropical, min. temperature 55F

Engkala - rare exotic fruit tree. Small fruit, with pink to purple skin and excellent delicate, avocado-like flavor. The fruits are little known, but reputedly well-liked by those who have had the chance to try them. Eaten fresh or used to prepare foods. The fruit can be used in the same way as the avocado. Litsea seeds contain fats that are used in the production of soaps and candles. The tree comes from Sarawak and South-west Sabah where it can be seen growing along riverbanks and scattered near villages. The foliage looks somewhat like that of the avocado, however the leaves are longer and droop more gracefully. There have been attempts to cultivate the engkala in Java. The round fruits (35 to 45 mm in diameter), flattened top and bottom, have thin, edible bright pink skins. Medium to thick flesh surrounds the single, avocado-like seed (1"). It is creamy-white and similar to avocado, but softer with a more delicate flavor. The fruit is prepared by rolling it around a basket, or hitting it with the back of a spoon. The seeds are a source of fat and are used to manufacture candles and soap. The engkala grows rapidly and tolerates high light levels if well watered.



Litsea garciae, Lepidadenia kawakamii, Litsea kawakamii, Tetradenia kawakamii, Engkala
Litsea garciae, Lepidadenia kawakamii, Litsea kawakamii, Tetradenia kawakamii, Engkala


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/litsea_garciae.htm

Magnolia liliifera, Talauma candollei, Magnolita, Egg Magnolia

Magnolia liliifera, Talauma candollei

Magnolita, Egg Magnolia
Family: Magnoliaceae
Origin: Thailand
Large shrub 5-10 ftSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunRegular waterWhite/off-white flowersFragrantUltra tropical, min. temperature 55F

Medium size tree with large velvet leaves and fragrant yellowish off-white flowers about 4-5" wide. Before opening, buds have an egg shape. One of the most valuable ornamental fragrant trees of Asia. A highly valued fragrant flower of this small tree or shrub resembles dwarf magnolia flower (magnolia figo, magnolia coco), but the scent is much stronger. Leaves are large, 7-9" long and 4" wide. Can be grown in container in a well-lit spot. Cold sensitive, can not tolerate even light frost. Magnolia liliifera formerly known as Talauma candollei. You can see that they are the same species even though some individuals may have larger leaves or flowers than others. M. lilliifera is similar to M. coco - as both species have those egg shaped flowerbuds. In M. coco however, the bud is shaped more like a baby coconut, hence the name Magnolia coco, Coconut Magnolia.

See Article about Tropical Magnolias.

See also Plants with scents as heady as incense: Enchanted Magnolias - Joy in your life...





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/magnolia_liliifera.htm

Maniltoa grandiflora, Maniltoa schefferi, Maniltoa hollrungii, Dove Tree, Handkerchief Tree, Ghost Tree, New Guinea Ghost Tree

Maniltoa grandiflora, Maniltoa schefferi, Maniltoa hollrungii

Dove Tree, Handkerchief Tree, Ghost Tree, New Guinea Ghost Tree
Family: Fabaceae
Subfamily: Caesalpinioideae
Origin: New Guinea
Small tree 10-20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterWhite/off-white flowersOrnamental foliageUltra tropical, min. temperature 55F

The tassel of juvenile leaves hanging down limp. Undoubtedly a handsome tree, it characteristically branches low but with the main branches ascending close to each other to form a tight multiple-stem with a surprisingly tidy symmetrical crown. It is the handkerchief tree par excellence, the large rounded crowns being covered with evenly spaced handkerchieves of white at frequent intervals. The limp tassels of new leaves first develop within large buds covered in papery brown scales. These foliage buds are very similar to the buds that protect the developing inflorescences. New leaves and inflorescences appear simultaneously. The inflorescences are mostly held at the ends of the branches and are made up of many white flowers with papery brown bracts. When first open, the inflorescences are very attractive in their virginal white with yellow anthers, but within a few days, they tend to brown where the flowers are damaged and the anthers have shed their pollen. The trees flush new leaves and blooms every few months and are particularly attractive in the evening twilight when the contrast between the hankies and the dark crown seems strongest.

See Article about this plant.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/maniltoa_grandiflora.htm

Maniltoa sp., Dove Tree, Handkerchief Tree, Ghost Tree
Maniltoa lenticellata (?)

Maniltoa sp.

Dove Tree, Handkerchief Tree, Ghost Tree
Family: Fabaceae
Subfamily: Caesalpinioideae
Origin: New Guinea
Small tree 10-20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterOrnamental foliageUltra tropical, min. temperature 55FUnknown name

The tassel of juvenile leaves hanging down limp. Undoubtedly a handsome tree, it characteristically branches low but with the main branches ascending close to each other to form a tight multiple-stem with a surprisingly tidy symmetrical crown. It is the handkerchief tree par excellence, the large rounded crowns being covered with evenly spaced handkerchieves of white at frequent intervals. The limp tassels of new leaves first develop within large buds covered in papery brown scales. These foliage buds are very similar to the buds that protect the developing inflorescences. New leaves and inflorescences appear simultaneously. The inflorescences are mostly held at the ends of the branches and are made up of many white flowers with papery brown bracts. When first open, the inflorescences are very attractive in their virginal white with yellow anthers, but within a few days they tend to brown where the flowers are damaged and the anthers have shed their pollen. The trees flush new leaves and blooms every few months and are particularly attractive in the evening twilight when the contrast between the hankies and the dark crown seems strongest. The flush leaves of Maniltoa browneoides are white becoming green within a few days.

Species:

Maniltoa browneoides

Maniltoa grandiflora

Maniltoa lenticellata

Maniltoa megalocephala





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/maniltoa_sp.htm
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