TROPICAL PLANT ENCYCLOPEDIA


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Number of plants found: 313    Prev  Next    Go to page:  First  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  Last  

Aralia spinosa, Devil's Walkingstick, Angelica Tree

Aralia spinosa

Devil's Walkingstick, Angelica Tree
Family: Araliaceae
Origin: Eastern North America
USDA Zone: 4-9?
USDA Plant Hardiness MapLarge shrub 5-10 ftSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeModerate waterWhite/off-white flowersDeciduousAttracts butterflies, hummingbirdsThorny or spinySubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

Aralia spinosa still grown for its decorative foliage, prickly stems, large showy flower panicles, and distinctive fall color.



Aralia spinosa, Devil's Walkingstick, Angelica Tree


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/aralia_spinosa.htm

Araucaria araucana, Araucaria imbricata, Monkey Puzzle Tree, Chilean Pine

Araucaria araucana, Araucaria imbricata

Monkey Puzzle Tree, Chilean Pine
Family: Araucariaceae
Origin: South America
USDA Plant Hardiness MapBig tree > 20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterModerate waterOrnamental foliageThorny or spinySeaside, salt tolerant plant

Among the most spectacular are forests of pure Araucaria Araucaria araucana, the hardiest of the genus, is a large, bizarre-looking evergreen, 60-70ft. tall and 30 to 35 feet wide, though the tallest specimens in its native haunts have been measured at over 150 ft. It forms a loose, symmetrical, see-through crown, pyramidal in youth, eventually with a rounded or flattish top. The scale-like leaves are dark green, stiff, sharp-pointed and densely arranged on upwardly-sweeping branches, looking more reptilian than coniferous in character. Because of this it comes to know surprise to most people that this species is estimated to be around 60 million years old, based upon fossil record known today.

Preferring well-drained, volcanic soil, this species is surprisingly tolerant of many soil types. It is very tolerant of maritime exposures, salt-laden winds, and thrives in cool, mild climates. It dislikes hot-dry soils and atmospheric pollution.

See article about Araucaria.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/araucaria_araucana.htm

Araucaria sp., Monkey Puzzle, Bunia Pine, Parana Nut
Araucaria heterophylla

Araucaria sp.

Monkey Puzzle, Bunia Pine, Parana Nut
Family: Araucariaceae
Origin: New Caledonia, Australia, South America
USDA Plant Hardiness MapBig tree > 20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeModerate waterOrnamental foliageEdibleThorny or spinySubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

Araucaria is a genus of coniferous trees. There are 19 species in the genus, with a highly disjunct distribution in New Caledonia (where 13 species are endemic), Norfolk Island, eastern Australia, New Guinea, Argentina, Chile, and southern Brazil.

Fossil evidence indicates that ancestral araucaria forests resembling the present-day Monkey Puzzle date back to the age of dinosaurs.

Some of the species are relatively common in cultivation because of their distinctive, formal symmetrical growth habit. Several species are economically important for timber production and the edible seeds.

See article about Araucaria.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/araucaria_sp.htm

Argemone sp., Prickly Poppy
Argemone mexicana

Argemone sp.

Prickly Poppy
Family: Papaveraceae
Origin: Mexico
USDA Plant Hardiness MapSmall shrub 2-5 ftFull sunSemi-shadeModerate waterWhite/off-white flowersOrnamental foliageYellow/orange flowersEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.Poisonous or toxicThorny or spiny

It is a prickly, glabrous, branching herb with yellow juice and showy yellow flowers. The plants is toxic to animals and cattle avoid grazing this plant.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/argemone_sp.htm

Aspalathus sp., Cape Gorse
Aspalathus burchelliana

Aspalathus sp.

Cape Gorse
Family: Fabaceae
Subfamily: Faboideae
Origin: South Africa
USDA Plant Hardiness MapLarge shrub 5-10 ftSmall shrub 2-5 ftFull sunModerate waterPink flowersYellow/orange flowersEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.Spice or herbThorny or spiny

Aspalathus, the genus to which the Rooibos Tea plant belongs, is endemic to South Africa.

Species of Aspalathus has never been developed into garden plants, although many attractive species show great potential as garden plants.



Aspalathus sp., Cape Gorse
Aspalathus burchelliana
Aspalathus sp., Cape Gorse


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/aspalathus_sp.htm
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