TROPICAL PLANT ENCYCLOPEDIA


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Yucca sp., Yucca, Adams Needle

Yucca sp.

Yucca, Adams Needle
Family: Asparagaceae   (Formerly:Agavaceae / Amaryllidaceae)
Subfamily: Agavoideae
Large shrub 5-10 ftFull sunModerate waterDry conditionsWhite/off-white flowersOrnamental foliageAttracts butterflies, hummingbirdsSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short timeSeaside, salt tolerant plant

Yucca is easy to grow in any well drained soil, acidic or alkaline, and it is moderately tolerant of salt spray and salty soils. Light: tolerates full sun to shade. Moisture: highly tolerant of drought. Propagation: Propagate yuccas from seeds or cuttings.





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Zamia integrifolia, Zamia floridana, Coontie, Coontie Palm, Koonti

Zamia integrifolia, Zamia floridana

Coontie, Coontie Palm, Koonti
Family: Zamiaceae
Origin: South of the USA, western Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Cayman Islands
Groundcover and low-growing 2ftFull sunShadeSemi-shadeModerate waterOrnamental foliageEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.Poisonous or toxicSeaside, salt tolerant plant

A small, tough, woody cycad native to the southeast United States (Florida, Georgia), the Bahamas and the Caribbean south to Grand Cayman and Puerto Rico (possibly extinct on this island). The common name is Coontie or Koonti, derived from the Seminole Native American language conti hateka. This cycad produces reddish seed cones with a distinct acuminate tip. The leaves are 1-3 ft long, with 5-30 pairs of leaflets (pinnae). Each leaflet is linear to lanceolate or oblong-obovate, 3-10" long and 1" wide, entire or with indistinct teeth at the tip. They are often revolute, with prickly petioles. It is similar in many respects to the closely related Zamia pumila, but that species differs in the more obvious toothing on the leaflets. This is a low-growing plant, with trunk that grows to 1 ft high and diameter, but is often subterranean. Over time, it forms a multi-branched cluster, with a large, tuberous root system, which is actually an extension of the above-ground stems. Like other cycads, Zamia integrifolia is dioecious, having male or female plants. The male cones are cylindrical, growing to 2-5" long; they are often clustered. The female cones are elongate-ovoid and grow to 2-6" cm long and 2-3" in diameter. Inhabits a variety of habitats with well-drained sands or sandy loam soils. It prefers filtered sunlight to partial shade. A very hardy, and easily grown species for sub-tropical, and warm temperate areas. They prefer lightly shaded, well drained sandy soils. Once common to locally abundant, Zamia integrifolia is becoming increasingly uncommon. Populations are presently limited to central Cuba and the Dominican Republic. Though it was once endemic to southern Puerto Rico and Haiti, it appears to have been eradicated in those areas due to intensive land use. This plant is poisonous, producing a toxin that affects the gastrointestinal tract and nervous system. The toxin can however be removed by careful leaching, and the roots and half-buried stems were used by Native American people (notably the Tequesta Indians, the Seminole Indians and the Maroons) for their yield of a sago-like starch. Sago is prepared from the stems. Sago is a dry granulated starch imported from the East Indies, much used for making puddings and as an article of diet for the sick; also, as starch, for stiffening textile fabrics. The root is typically prepared for food by grinding it using a wooden mortar and pestle. The pulp is then saturated and drained. The drained fluid is allowed to dry and the resulting yellowish flour is used in the preparation of various foods. In industrial preparation, multiple macerations serve to bleach the flour to a whiter color.





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Zamia sp., Coontie Palm

Zamia sp.

Coontie Palm
Family: Zamiaceae
Origin: America
Large shrub 5-10 ftSmall shrub 2-5 ftFull sunSemi-shadeModerate waterThorny or spiny



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Zantedeschia aethiopica, Calla aethiopica, Arum Lily, Calla Lily

Zantedeschia aethiopica, Calla aethiopica

Arum Lily, Calla Lily
Family: Araceae
Origin: South Africa
Small shrub 2-5 ftFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterWhite/off-white flowersIrritating

Zantedeschia aethiopica is a rhizomatous herbaceous perennial plant, evergreen where rainfall and temperatures are adequate, deciduous where there is a dry season.

Commonly called calla lilies, these are not true lilies, but are arum (Jack-in-the-pulpit) family members. They are stemless plants whose flowers and leaves rise directly from rhizomes. They typically grow in clumps to 24-36" tall and feature large arrowhead-shaped (sagittate) leaves and extremely showy flowers consisting of a yellow finger-like spadix surrounded by a bright white spathe borne atop a leafless stalk. Commercially grown as a very popular cut flower.

Winter hardy to USDA Zone 8, and may survive some Zone 7 winters with protection. Best in moist soils with full sun to part shade. Lift rhizomes in fall and store in a damp medium such as peat or immediately replant in containers to overwinter as a houseplant. Calla lilies may be planted in mud at the edge of ponds or water gardens.

May also be grown year-round in containers that must be brought indoors in winter before first frost. Overwintering containers placed near a window with bright indirect light can make attractive houseplants.



Zantedeschia aethiopica, Calla aethiopica, Arum Lily, Calla Lily
Zantedeschia aethiopica White Giant
Zantedeschia aethiopica, Calla aethiopica, Arum Lily, Calla Lily
Zantedeschia aethiopica, Calla aethiopica, Arum Lily, Calla Lily
Zantedeschia aethiopica, Calla aethiopica, Arum Lily, Calla Lily


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/zantedeschia_aethiopica.htm

Zantedeschia aethiopica - seeds

Calla Lily is a rhizomatous herbaceous perennial plant with beautiful waxy white flowers so popular as cut flowers. It is evergreen where rainfall and temperatures are adequate, deciduous where there is a dry season.
Ordering seeds info

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Zantedeschia sp., Arum Lily, Calla Lily

Zantedeschia sp.

Arum Lily, Calla Lily
Family: Araceae
Origin: South Africa
Groundcover and low-growing 2ftSmall shrub 2-5 ftFull sunSemi-shadeBog or aquaticKeep soil moistPink flowersWhite/off-white flowersUnusual colorOrnamental foliageRed/crimson/vinous flowersYellow/orange flowersFragrantEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.Attracts butterflies, hummingbirdsPoisonous or toxicFlood tolerant

This is an old fashioned, but very rewarding garden plant. Zantedeschia is named after Professor Zantedeschi, probably Giovanni Zantedeschi, 1773-1846, an Italian physician and botanist. The flowers are faintly scented and this attracts various crawling insects and bees which are responsible for pollinating the flowers. The spathe turns green after flowering and covers the ripening berries. It rots away when these are ripe and the succulent yellow berries attract birds, which are responsible for seed dispersal. The rhizome is large and eaten by wild pigs and porcupines and the ripe fruit enjoyed by birds. Raw plant material causes swelling of the throat because of microscopic, sharp calcium oxalate crystals. The leaves are used as a poultice and a treatment for headaches. May be used as a marginal plant along streams, or on the edge of a pond. Plant in partial shade if there is no permanent water. It can be planted as a foliage plant in deep shade under trees but will not flower well in this position. It is fast growing and likes very rich, well-drained conditions. It is an excellent cutflower and lasts a long time in water. Nowadays there are other forms of this species which will enliven an old theme. There is also an attractive form with leaves spotted white. Requires consistently moist soil.

See Zantedeschia aethiopica.





Link to this plant:
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