TROPICAL PLANT ENCYCLOPEDIA


Pictogram Guide · Mouse over pictogram for definition

Number of plants found: 381    Prev  Next    Go to page:  First  68  69  70  71  72  73  74  75  76  77

Tricyrtis macrantha, Tricyrtis macranthopsis, Yellow Chinese Toad Lily

Tricyrtis macrantha, Tricyrtis macranthopsis

Yellow Chinese Toad Lily
Family: Liliaceae   (Formerly:Uvulariaceae / Liliaceae)
Subfamily: Calochortoideae
Origin: Japan
Groundcover and low-growing 2ftShadeSemi-shadeRegular waterModerate waterYellow/orange flowersSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

Large clear yellow bell shaped flowers bloom along the stem in late summer and early Fall. This is one of the best toad lilies but it is slower to spread making an impressive clump in 2-3 years. Preferring a sheltered semi-shaded site with adequate moisture they make ideal subjects for the woodland garden. Propagation: By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets); from seed.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/tricyrtis_macrantha.htm

Trifolium repens, White Clover, Dutch Clover, Ladino

Trifolium repens

White Clover, Dutch Clover, Ladino
Family: Fabaceae
Subfamily: Faboideae
Origin: Europe
Groundcover and low-growing 2ftFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterModerate waterWhite/off-white flowersAttracts butterflies, hummingbirdsSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short timeFlood tolerant

This perfect ground cover legume is a vigorous, easy-to-grow clover that will produce large, white blooms. White Clover is perfect for using as a cover plant or integrated into grass as it can handle foot traffic! The plant has ability to fix Nitrogen so it is often used as cover crop and for enriching soils. Flowers are attractive to bees, and a good forage plant for livestock.

Trifolium repens is a herbaceous perennial plant and one of the most widely cultivated types of clover. It has been widely introduced worldwide as a forage crop, and is now also common in most grassy areas (lawns and gardens) of North America, Australia and New Zealand.

It does best in well-drained soil, is extremely fast and easy to grow, spreading each year. White Clover can be planted between row plantings or as a solid cover.

White Clover does not grow well in highly alkaline soils. It has shallow roots, meaning that it will not tolerate much drought. It will tolerate sandy soil if given plenty of water. White Clovers in general can handle more foot traffic than other clovers and will also tolerate more heat.



Trifolium repens, White Clover, Dutch Clover, Ladino
Trifolium repens, White Clover, Dutch Clover, Ladino


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/trifolium_repens.htm

Tropaeolum majus, Tropaeolum hybridum, Garden Nasturtium, Indian Cress, Monks Cress

Tropaeolum majus, Tropaeolum hybridum

Garden Nasturtium, Indian Cress, Monks Cress
Family: Tropaeolaceae
Origin: South America
Groundcover and low-growing 2ftVine or creeperSmall shrub 2-5 ftFull sunRegular waterWhite/off-white flowersOrnamental foliageRed/crimson/vinous flowersYellow/orange flowersEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.Spice or herbAttracts butterflies, hummingbirdsEdibleSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

This garden favorite will spread like wildfire, produce decorative foliage, have an ocean of brightly-colored blossoms. It is a herbaceous fast growing flowering plant originating in South America in the Andes from Bolivia north to Colombia. Cultivated varieties have hybrid origin, with possible parent species including T. minus, T. moritzianum, T. peltophorum, and T. peregrinum. Trailing stems grow to a few feet. The leaves are large, nearly circular. They have a beauty of their own. Reminiscent of water lily pads, the more common ones are flat and round, with the stem attached to the center and the vein radiating out from there. Garden Nasturtiums are grown for their flowers, and also because both their leaves and flowers are edible; they can be used in salads, imparting a delicately peppery taste. Although the blossoms appear delicate, they are actually very durable and make for vibrant and long-lasting garnishes, one of their best uses. Use the blossoms either whole or chopped to decorate creamy soups, salads, butters, cakes and platters. Their sweet, peppery taste (both in the leaves and in the flowers) adds to the enjoyment. In fact, it is for its tangy taste that nasturtium gets its common name. It comes from the Latin "Nasus Tortus" meaning convulsed nose, referring to the faces people made when tasting the spicy plant. Take advantage of this spicy flavor as well as the decorative color. Use both leaves and blossoms in salads. Try adding them to spinach salads for a dramatic effect. Nasturtium's spiciness is also a winning addition to cheese spreads. The seeds are also edible, and can be used as a caper substitute and as a substitute for black pepper. Being high in vitamin C, nasturtiums act as a natural antibiotic, and as such were used topically as a poultice for minor cuts and scratches. Nasturtiums are also used in Ayurvedic medicine.

Nasturtiums are a gardener's dream. They are virtually carefree once established. Snails don't seem to be interested in them. They will even self seed and come back the next year in mild climate. Nasturtium is a good choice as a fast growing, ever-blooming showy ground cover. It is a great butterfly attractor. Ideally, nasturtiums like to be in full sun, with moist, well drained soil. Nasturtiums come in two forms: compact and trailing. The compact variety is low and busy, usually staying at about 12" tall. They are useful as border plants, creating a colorful and dense edge. The trailing variety cascades dramatically down walls or tumbles brightly out of hanging baskets. They are also perfect for window boxes and container herb gardens. Just be sure to keep them trimmed back or they will crowd out the other plants. Enjoy them all summer long!





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/tropaeolum_majus.htm

Tulbaghia violacea, Wild Garlic

Tulbaghia violacea

Wild Garlic
Family: Amaryllidaceae   (Formerly:Alliaceae / Liliaceae /Amaryllidaceae)
Subfamily: Allioideae
Origin: South Africa
Groundcover and low-growing 2ftSmall shrub 2-5 ftFull sunModerate waterBlue/lavender/purple flowersEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.Edible

This is a popular garden plant that is useful for difficult hot corners of the garden as it will tolerate prolonged drought, although it flourishes with regular watering.

Tulbaghia violacea is a fast-growing, bulbous plant that reaches a height of 0.5 m. The leaves are long, narrow, strap-like, slightly fleshy and smell strongly of garlic when bruised. They grow from fat, tuberous roots which spread to form clumps of plants. The pinkish mauve, tubular flowers, clustered into umbels of up to twenty flowers, are held above the leaves on a tall flower stalk, and appear over a long period. They too smell of garlic when picked.

This attractive plant is ideal for the herb garden, as both the leaves and flowers can be used in salads and other dishes. The crushed leaves may be used to help cure sinus headaches and to discourage moles from the garden (by their strong smell). The smell repels fleas, ticks and mosquitoes when crushed on the skin.

The fresh bulbs are boiled in water and the decoctions are taken orally to clear up coughs and colds. The bulb has been used as a remedy for pulmonary tuberculosis and to destroy intestinal worms. Wild garlic may prove to have the same or similar antibacterial and antifungal activities as has been scientifically verified for real garlic. The leaves are used to treat cancer of the oesophagus.

The Zulus use the leaves and flowers as spinach and as a hot, peppery seasoning with meat and potatoes. They also use the bulb to make an aphrodisiac medicine. Wild garlic is a very good snake repellent and for this reason the Zulus plant it around their homes.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/tulbaghia_violacea.htm

Turnera subulata, Key West Butter Cup

Turnera subulata

Key West Butter Cup
Family: Turneraceae
Origin: Central America
Groundcover and low-growing 2ftSmall shrub 2-5 ftFull sunDry conditionsWhite/off-white flowersYellow/orange flowersAttracts butterflies, hummingbirdsSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

Butter Cup. One of the most popular landscape plants, low growing shrub. Everblooming, attracts butterflies. The brown eye inside the white flower draws bees in to pollinate. It is one of the most stunning of flowers. Blossoms open at sunrise and close at sunset.

The plant prefers red sandy loam.

See article about this plant: Turnera - Aphrodisiac Superherb





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/turnera_subulata.htm
Prev  
Next


Use link to repeat this search:
https://toptropicals.com/cgi-bin/garden_catalog/cat.cgi?search_op=and&keyword_op=and&language=e&number=5&no_change_lang=1
&v1=grd&user=tt&sale=1&first=0