TROPICAL PLANT ENCYCLOPEDIA


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Number of plants found: 446    Prev    Go to page:  First  84  85  86  87  88  89  90

Washingtonia filifera, California Fan Palm, Desert Fan Palm, American Cotton Palm, Cotton Palm

Washingtonia filifera

California Fan Palm, Desert Fan Palm, American Cotton Palm, Cotton Palm
Family: Arecaceae / Palmae
Origin: California
Big tree > 20 ftFull sunModerate waterPalm or palm-likeThorny or spinySeaside, salt tolerant plant

California Fan Palm can grow 60 ft tall with a crown spread of 15 ft. The massive gray trunk is barrel shaped and ringed with old leaf scars, and may reach over 3 ft in diameter at its widest point. California Fan Palm can have up to thirty gray-green palmate (fan-shaped) leaves, each 3-6 ft across. They spread out to form a loose and open crown. The petioles (leaf stems) of mature palms are armed along the margins with curved thorns; those of young palms are largely unarmed. The individual leaflets are pendulous and swing freely in the wind. Abundant cotton-like threads on and between the leaflets persist even when the palm is mature. People often confuse W.Filifera and W.Robusta .as they are quite similar, particularly when small. The main distinguishing features are that Filifera is shorter and fatter, more big thorns and has cotton threads even when old. Robusta is much more slender, almost no thorns and only has cotton threads when young. W.Filifera is surprisingly cold hardy and will survive a Southern UK winter with slight protection when the plant is about 3 feet tall. A fantastic palm for the beginner, quick and easy to grow from seed (germinate in about 2 weeks) and a must have for the tropical garden. The seeds of California Fan Palm are small cm in diameter, they germinate very easily in a warm place compared to other palms. Washingtonia seeds will typically take about 10 to 21 days to germinate and sprout above the ground, if planted about 1" below the surface. For best results place some soil in a small plastic bag and hang in a warm place in your house. Prefers full sun when large, well drained situation with regular watering.



Washingtonia filifera, California Fan Palm, Desert Fan Palm, American Cotton Palm, Cotton Palm
Washingtonia filifera, California Fan Palm, Desert Fan Palm, American Cotton Palm, Cotton Palm
Washingtonia filifera, California Fan Palm, Desert Fan Palm, American Cotton Palm, Cotton Palm
Washingtonia filifera, California Fan Palm, Desert Fan Palm, American Cotton Palm, Cotton Palm


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/washingtonia_filifera.htm

Washingtonia robusta, Washingtonia, Mexican Fan Palm

Washingtonia robusta

Washingtonia, Mexican Fan Palm
Family: Arecaceae / Palmae
Origin: Mexico, Florida
Big tree > 20 ftFull sunModerate waterPalm or palm-likeThorny or spinySubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short timeSeaside, salt tolerant plant

Form: tall palm with fan fronds and thin trunk. Size: 75ft or more, frond spread 10-12ft, trunk diameter may be only 12-14in. Leaves: fan 3-4ft wide, petioles are typically toothed, bright green. Flowers: large stalks extend beyond fronds with small white/cream flowers, bloom in early summer. Fruit: pea-sized black/blue seed. Stems/Trunks: distinctively narrow, sways in wind. Hardiness: leaf damage at 20°F, recovers quickly; hard freezes may completely kill even mature specimens Landscape: skyline, tree silhouette, tropical effect Culture: full sun, rapidly grows above all other canopy. Water: moderate, deep, drought tolerant; best on once per month. Propagation: seed from isolated source; hybridizes readily . Maintenance: high; frond removal, trunk shaving, will sometimes self shave if leaves fall off cleanly grows rapidly (6ft per year). When young most people prefer shaved trunk look, frond removal and shaving best done professionally. Tolerates soils and drought. Vulnerable to root rot in wet soils.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/wasingtonia_robusta.htm

Wollemia nobilis, Wollemi Pine

Wollemia nobilis

Wollemi Pine
Family: Araucariaceae
Origin: Australia
Big tree > 20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterOrnamental foliageSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

A majestic conifer with attractive, unusual dark green foliage and bubbly bark, the Wollemi Pine is one of the world's oldest and rarest trees. Paleontologists say that it is likely that dinosaurs crossed paths with the Wollemi Pine and may have eaten Wollemi leaves.

Discovered (1994) in a rainforest gorge within Wollemi National Park (Australia).

The stunning patio and indoor plant (in well lit positions) and feature tree for parks and large gardens.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/wollemia_nobilis.htm

x Chitalpa tashkentensis, Chitalpa

x Chitalpa tashkentensis

Chitalpa
Family: Bignoniaceae
Big tree > 20 ftSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeModerate waterPink flowersWhite/off-white flowersAttracts butterflies, hummingbirdsSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

The Chitalpa is a cross between Catalpa bignonioides and Chilopsis linearis. The Chilopsis is a desert tree, sometimes called a Desert Willow. From the Chilopsis, the Chitalpa inherits long 3 to 5 inch dark green leaves and the ability to withstand some dry heat. However, unlike its desert parent, the Chitalpa can withstand low temperatures of around minus 15 degrees. Flowers are orchidlike and produced in July or August at the ends of new growth. At several feet a year the Chitalpa reaches its 25 to 30 foot height and breadth quickly and makes shady spots fast. It is a drought-resistant plant, a trait inherited from the desert willow, and it is fairly hardy, having withstood temperatures as low as 9F. It has been noted that it will freeze back to the ground in Zone 6. Although many fast-growing trees are intolerant of windy situations, chitalpa can withstand even strong winds without breakage. Unlike either of its parents, chitalpa is sterile and produces no messy seed pods. Propagation: Cuttings. The initial hybrids between Catalpa and Chilopsis were created in Uzbekistan in 1964 and introduced to the United States by Robert Hebb of the New York Botanic Garden in 1977. (Chitalpa is a combination of the scientific name of the two parents, while the specific name identifies the city in Uzbekistan where the hybrids were created.) Although in cultivation in the United States during the 1980s, the hybrid remained unnamed until 1991 when Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden assigned the name x Chitalpa tashkentensis.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/chitalpa_tashkentensis.htm

Xanthophyllum obscurum, Banisterodes insigne, Banisterodes obscurum, Xanthophyllum insigne, Xanthophyllum scortechinii, Merbatu

Xanthophyllum obscurum, Banisterodes insigne, Banisterodes obscurum, Xanthophyllum insigne, Xanthophyllum scortechinii

Merbatu
Family: Polygalaceae
Origin: Southeast Asia
Big tree > 20 ftSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterModerate waterWhite/off-white flowers


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/xanthophyllum_obscurum.htm
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