TROPICAL PLANT ENCYCLOPEDIA


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Actinidia deliciosa, Kiwi Fruit, Chinese Gooseberry

Actinidia deliciosa

Kiwi Fruit, Chinese Gooseberry
Family: Actinidiaceae
Origin: China
USDA Zone: 7-9?
USDA Plant Hardiness MapVine or creeperFull sunRegular waterWhite, off-white flowersYellow, orange flowersFragrantDeciduous plantAttracts butterflies, hummingbirdsEdibleSubtropical, mature plant cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

Actinidia deliciosa (Kiwi Fruit) can grow in full sun and requires regular water. The vine or creeper is deciduous, dropping its leaves in winter. The mature plant is cold hardy in the USDA Zones 7-9. The flowers are white or off-white, and the plant attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. The flowers are fragrant, dioecious or bisexual. Male and female flowers appear on different plants and both sexes have to be planted in close proximity for fruit set.

The fruits can be eaten fresh, juiced, dried, or preserved. The health benefits of Kiwifruit are immense. It is a very good source of dietary fiber, vitamin C, vitamin K, potassium and copper. It also contains vitamins A and E, folate, and some omega-3 fatty acids. One kiwifruit contains about 46 calories and provides 13 percent of the daily Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) of vitamin C and, 9 percent of the RDA of dietary fiber. Actinidia deliciosa has the potential to produce hundreds of fruit if planted with another compatible and cross-pollinated variety. The plants may take 3-4 years to bear fruit, but when it matures it can produce great quantities of kiwifruit. The fruit can be harvested when the fruit turns a golden-brown color, and when it is easily plucked from the vine.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/actinidia_deliciosa.htm

Actinidia kolomikta, Kiwi

Actinidia kolomikta

Kiwi
Family: Actinidiaceae
Origin: East Asia
USDA Zone: 4-9?
USDA Plant Hardiness MapVine or creeperSemi-shadeRegular waterModerate waterOrnamental foliageDeciduous plantEdibleSubtropical, mature plant cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

Actinidia kolomikta is a vine or creeper from the Actinidiaceae family, originating from East Asia. It has decorative foliage, with leaves turning red, pink and white in the fall. The leaves are green and creamy white and can be up to 4 inches long. It is a deciduous plant, which means it loses its leaves in the winter.

Actinidia kolomikta prefers semi-shade and regular water, but can tolerate moderate water. It is a fast growing plant, reaching up to 30 ft. It requires support to grow and climb, however it will not produce fruit without both a male and female plant. It is grown in USDA Zone 4-9.

The fruit of the Actinidia kolomikta is sweet and grape-sized, with a yellow or light orange skin. The green, juicy flesh has a light, sour flavor. It can be eaten fresh or cooked, and is a good source of Vitamin C, Vitamin A, and dietary fibers. The fruit can also be used to make jams and jellies. A mature plant can produce up to 100 fruits per season, depending on the care and conditions.

Actinidia kolomikta is an edible, ornamental plant that is easy to care for and can provide a good harvest of sweet, juicy fruit.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/actinidia_kolomikta.htm

Actinidia sp., Actinidia, Kiwi

Actinidia sp.

Actinidia, Kiwi
Family: Actinidiaceae
Origin: Eastern Asia
USDA Zone: 8-10?
USDA Plant Hardiness MapLarge shrub 5-10 ft tallVine or creeperFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterModerate waterWhite, off-white flowersEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.EdibleSubtropical, mature plant cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

Actinidia sp. (Actinidia) is an attractive and fast-growing perennial plant native to eastern Asia. It typically will reach a mature size of 5-10 feet tall, either as a large shrub or as a vine or creeper. This plant is well-suited for full sun and semi-shade areas, and requires regular water for good growth. Actinidia sp. produces white and off-white flowers, which are especially attractive in spring and summer.

Ethnomedical uses of Actinidia include edible Kiwi fruits; the fruits are high in vitamin C and other healthy elements. Depending on the species, a mature plant can produce a range of up to a few hundred fruits per season. The fruits can be tart or sweet, and are usually eaten fresh or canned as juices or jams.

Actinidia is a hardy plant, able to withstand cold temperatures at least to 30s F for a short time. It is optimally grown in USDA Zone 8-10 and is an excellent choice for gardeners in cold climates who would like to try growing the plant in a pot. To do this successfully, it is important to make sure the container is of an appropriate size and is stored in an area free from harsh winter winds. Potting soil should be kept moist and watered as needed, and if temperatures are expected to drop far below freezing, the pot should be covered.

Overall, Actinidia is a beautiful and versatile plant that is easy to care for and produce a bounty of edible fruits which are high in vitamins and other essential nutrients. While it is hardy to moderately cold temperatures, careful precautions should be taken if grown in a pot to ensure the Actinidia is able to survive the winter and produce healthful fruit for many seasons to come.



Actinidia sp., Actinidia, Kiwi
Actinidia rufa
Actinidia sp., Actinidia, Kiwi
Actinidia sp., Actinidia, Kiwi
Actinidia sp., Actinidia, Kiwi


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/actinidia_sp.htm

Actiniopteris semiflabellata, Eyelash Fern

Actiniopteris semiflabellata

Eyelash Fern
Family: Pteridaceae
Origin: Eastern Africa
USDA Plant Hardiness MapSmall plant 2-5 ftSemi-shadeModerate water

A small, tropical fern producing very pretty, palm-like fronds on a diminutive scale. It like evenly moist conditions with moderate humidity during it's summer growing period, it should be watered sparingly and carefully during colder months.



Actiniopteris semiflabellata, Eyelash Fern
Actiniopteris semiflabellata, Eyelash Fern
Actiniopteris semiflabellata, Eyelash Fern


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/actiniopteris_semiflabellata.htm

Actinodium cunninghamii, Swamp Daisy

Actinodium cunninghamii

Swamp Daisy
Family: Myrtaceae
Origin: Western Australia
USDA Plant Hardiness MapSmall plant 2-5 ftFull sunSemi-shadeModerate waterDry conditionsWhite, off-white flowersRed, crimson, vinous flowersAttracts butterflies, hummingbirds

Actinodium cunninghamii, also known as the Swamp Daisy, is a small plant that can grow up to 2-5 ft in height. A native to Western Australia, it is an evergreen shrub that is popular for its white and off-white flowers. In rare cases the flowers may bloom in a range of colors including red, crimson and vinous.

This small flower is also popular for its ability to attract butterflies and hummingbirds. It is tolerant of both dry and moderately wet environments. To grow well, Actinodium cunninghameii needs good soil drainage and should be watered regularly. It is tolerant of both full sun and semi-shade but it is important to ensure that it is kept moist in warm climates.

Actinodium Cunninghameii is hardy to USDA Zone 9-11. In cooler climates, it should be planted in a sheltered area to protect it from cold winds and frost. If container planting in a colder climate it is important to keep the soil moist but not too wet. A mulch can be used to help keep the roots from getting too cold in the winter.

Overall,Actinodium cunninghameii is a low-maintenance species that is suitable for a wide range of climates. With good soil drainage and enough sunlight, it will thrive in both warm and cold climates. Its easy to care for nature makes it an ideal choice for gardeners looking to add some colorful variety to their garden.




Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/actinodium_cunninghamii.htm

Adansonia digitata, Baobab, Cream of Tartar tree, Monkey-bread tree, Lemonade tree, Upside-down Tree

Adansonia digitata

Baobab, Cream of Tartar tree, Monkey-bread tree, Lemonade tree, Upside-down Tree
Family: Malvaceae    (Formerly:Bombacaceae)
Subfamily: Bombacoideae
Origin: South Africa
USDA Plant Hardiness MapBig tree taller than 20 ftFull sunModerate waterWhite, off-white flowersOrnamental foliageEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.Attracts butterflies, hummingbirdsSubtropical, mature plant cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

Regarded as the largest succulent in the world, the baobab tree is steeped in a wealth of mystique, legend and superstition wherever it occurs in Africa. It is a tree that can provide food, water, shelter, and relief from sickness. During drought, elephants obtain moisture by chewing on the wood. The stem is covered with a bark layer, which may be 50-100 mm thick. The leaves are hand-sized and divided into 5-7 finger-like leaflets. The baobab is a deciduous, meaning that in winter, it sheds all of its leaves and grows new ones in spring. The large, pendulous flowers (up to 200 mm in diameter) are white and sweetly scented ,that are pollinated by bats. They are followed by velvety fruits full of edible acidic pulp sought by both monkeys and people. In the dryer, temperate regions of Africa, Baobabs are a tree of myth and legend. Baobabs are carefully tended by rural peoples and are particularly useful: the hollow trunks of baobabs are used as dwellings and storehouses, traditional medicines are obtained from its bark, leaves, and fruit. Its bark can be pounded to produce fibers that are used to make baskets, cloth, hats, mats, nets, rope, and strings (interestingly, after the bark is stripped away, the baobab grows new bark). Its leaves are cooked and eaten as greens, and are dried for use as a seasoning and a sauce and stew thickener. Its fruit is rich in vitamin C, calcium, and iron, and is called pain de singe or monkey bread. It can be roasted, ground, and boiled to make a coffee-substitute; it is also soaked in water to make a refreshing drink, and is used as a flavoring. They will make a handsome addition to a large garden, estate, or large parkland providing the soil is not waterlogged. Baobabs cannot tolerate even mild frost. When they are young, baobabs do not resemble their adult counterparts, the stems are thin and inconspicuous, and their leaves are simple and not divided into the five to seven lobes of the adult trees. Saplings can be effectively grown in containers or tubs for many years before becoming too large and requiring to be planted into the ground.

See article about Adansonia.

See how to grow Baobab bonsai

Article about endangered Baobabs.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/adansonia_digitata.htm

Adansonia digitata - Baobab Tree

Baobab. The massive, usually squat cylindrical trunk gives rise to thick tapering branches resembling a root-system, which is why it has often been referred to as the upside-down tree. Regarded as the largest succulent plant in the world, the baobab tree is steeped in a wealth of mystique, legend and superstition wherever it occurs in Africa. It is a tree that can provide, food, water, shelter and relief from sickness.

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See picture of a mature tree

This item is certified for shipping to California.
Grown in
6-10"/1-3 gal pot
In stock
$47.95


Adansonia grandidieri, Grandidier's Baobab, Giant Baobab

Adansonia grandidieri

Grandidier's Baobab, Giant Baobab
Family: Malvaceae    (Formerly:Bombacaceae)
Subfamily: Bombacoideae
Origin: Madagascar
USDA Plant Hardiness MapCan be used for bonsaiBig tree taller than 20 ftFull sunModerate waterWhite, off-white flowersDeciduous plantEdible

Native to Madagascar and growing with a massive, cylindrical bole, Grandidier's Baobab, Adansonia grandidieri, can be a large tree, reaching up to 80 ft tall. The tree is mostly found in a restricted area, threatening its survival due to habitat destruction and regeneration. Despite being threatened, Grandidier's Baobab remains very versatile and is popular among bonsai enthusiasts.

Grandidier's Baobab can prosper in full sun, or on rare occasions in partial shade, and needs moderate watering. If grown in cold regions, pots should be elevated to ensure better drainage and should be sheltered during winter. It has a flat-topped, light crown with few branches, and white to off-white flowers. It produces edible fruits, with oil-rich seeds, making it a valuable source of food and fiber for thatching.

Grandidier's Baobab can produce hundreds of fruits, depending on the age and weather conditions, each fruit weighing about 250g. The fruits are orange and oval-shaped with a pulp containing a few large seeds. It has a pleasant taste and can be used to make refreshing drinks, jams, salads, and other desserts. Grandidier's Baobab is also rich in vitamins, minerals and antioxidants such as vitamin C, phosphorus, and fiber, providing healthy benefits and being an important component of the Malagasy diet.



Adansonia grandidieri, Grandidier's Baobab, Giant Baobab
Adansonia grandidieri, Grandidier's Baobab, Giant Baobab
Adansonia grandidieri, Grandidier's Baobab, Giant Baobab


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/adansonia_grandidieri.htm

Adansonia gregorii, Boab, Baobab, Australian Bottle Tree

Adansonia gregorii

Boab, Baobab, Australian Bottle Tree
Family: Malvaceae    (Formerly:Bombacaceae)
Subfamily: Bombacoideae
Origin: Northern Territory, West Australia
USDA Plant Hardiness MapBig tree taller than 20 ftFull sunModerate waterWhite, off-white flowersDeciduous plantAttracts butterflies, hummingbirds

Adansonia gregorii is native to the northern parts of Western Australia and the Northern Territory. Once appropriate conditions are provided, it thrives in USDA zoning 9-11, and can reach up to 20 feet tall. It prefers a full sun location and regular watering, usually around 1-2 times a week. The swallow-shaped trunk, in combination with its light green leaves, gives the plant an interesting texture and an overall rounded-look.

The flowers are the showpieces of the Adansonia gregorii, ranging from off-white to white in color and bell-like in shape. They are known to attract butterflies and hummingbirds which adds a whimsical, airy feel to the garden.

The Boab tree is deciduous and sheds its leaves during the winter and spring months. Once it goes dormant in the late summer or early autumn, it is best to preserve the existing moisture level.

Adansonia gregorii is best grown in pots in colder regions. Loamy soil is preferred and watering once a week is more than enough. Depending on the climate and indoor location and temperature, the Boab tree may benefit from careful pruning to reduce its growth so it can comfortably fit in its container. Keeping the moisture level during its dormant season is essential to prevent any damage to the plant.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/adansonia_gregorii.htm

Adansonia madagascariensis, Madagascar Baobab

Adansonia madagascariensis

Madagascar Baobab
Family: Malvaceae    (Formerly:Bombacaceae)
Subfamily: Bombacoideae
Origin: Madagascar
USDA Plant Hardiness MapBig tree taller than 20 ftFull sunModerate waterRed, crimson, vinous flowersDeciduous plantAttracts butterflies, hummingbirds

This tree has a unique, swollen bottle-like trunk. This deciduous tree bears large, red flowers and ball-like fruits.




Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/adansonia_madagascariensis.htm

Adansonia rubrostipa, Baobab

Adansonia rubrostipa

Baobab
Family: Malvaceae    (Formerly:Bombacaceae)
Subfamily: Bombacoideae
Origin: West Coast of Madagascar
USDA Plant Hardiness MapBig tree taller than 20 ftSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunModerate waterPink flowersYellow, orange flowersAttracts butterflies, hummingbirds

Medium to large trees in between 17-65 feet in height. This tree can either have; sphere-like, bottle-shaped, or rarely, tapering trunks. The irregular crown, has major branches most often horizontal, rarely conical spines on upper surfaces of branches. Bark is usually reddish brown and exfoliating. Leaves occur from November to April and the Flowers Usually from February to April, at the latest in June. The fruit ripens from October to November. It has edible fruits, seeds and roots.




Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/adansonia_rubrostipa.htm
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