TROPICAL PLANT ENCYCLOPEDIA


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Number of plants found: 4924    Prev  Next    Go to page:  First  423  424  425  426  427  428  429  430  431  432  Last  

Sinomenium acutum, Chinese Moonseed

Sinomenium acutum

Chinese Moonseed
Family: Menispermaceae
Origin: Eastern Asia
Vine or creeperFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterModerate waterEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.DeciduousSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

Sinomenium acutum is a deciduous climber growing to 6 m.



Sinomenium acutum, Chinese Moonseed
Sinomenium acutum, Chinese Moonseed


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/sinomenium_acutum.htm

Siphonchilus sp.

Siphonchilus sp.

Family: Zingiberaceae
Origin: Africa
Small shrub 2-5 ftShadeSemi-shadePink flowersWhite/off-white flowersBlue/lavender/purple flowersYellow/orange flowersDeciduousSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

Siphonochilus is a genus of plants native to sub-Saharan Africa.

This genus usually goes dormant from November-May.

See Article about African gingers by John Banta.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/siphonchilus_sp.htm

Siphonodon celastrineus, Xanthophyllum subglobosum, Ma Duk
Siphonodon variegated

Siphonodon celastrineus, Xanthophyllum subglobosum

Ma Duk
Family: Celastraceae
Origin: Southeastern Asia
Can be used for bonsaiBig tree > 20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterWhite/off-white flowersOrnamental foliage

Siphonodon celastrineus, Xanthophyllum subglobosum, Ma Duk
Siphonodon variegated


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/siphonodon_celastrineus.htm

Sisyrinchium sp., Blue-eyed Grass, Golden-eyed Grass, Yellow-eyed Grass
Sisyrinchium macrocarpum

Sisyrinchium sp.

Blue-eyed Grass, Golden-eyed Grass, Yellow-eyed Grass
Family: Iridaceae
Origin: North America
Small shrub 2-5 ftFull sunRegular waterWhite/off-white flowersBlue/lavender/purple flowersYellow/orange flowersSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

Sisyrinchium can be annuals or rhizomatous perennials forming a clump of narrowly sword-shaped leaves with star-shaped or bell-shaped flowers.



Sisyrinchium sp., Blue-eyed Grass, Golden-eyed Grass, Yellow-eyed Grass
Sisyrinchium bellum
Sisyrinchium sp., Blue-eyed Grass, Golden-eyed Grass, Yellow-eyed Grass
Sisyrinchium tolucense
Sisyrinchium sp., Blue-eyed Grass, Golden-eyed Grass, Yellow-eyed Grass
Sisyrinchium striatum
Sisyrinchium sp., Blue-eyed Grass, Golden-eyed Grass, Yellow-eyed Grass
Sisyrinchium striatum


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/sisyrinchium_sp.htm

Skimmia sp., Skimmia
Skimmia x confusa

Skimmia sp.

Skimmia
Family: Rutaceae
Origin: Japan, China, South East Asia
Small shrub 2-5 ftSemi-shadeRegular waterWhite/off-white flowersYellow/orange flowersAttracts butterflies, hummingbirdsSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

Skimmia is a shrub for year round interest with its handsome, glossy foliage that blends well with other shade-tolerant plants and fragrant white flowers in spring, followed by luscious red berries in winter. It is perfect for growing in containers and provides good all year round color.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/skimmia_sp.htm

Sloanea sp., Sloanea

Sloanea sp.

Sloanea
Family: Elaeocarpaceae
Origin: Southeast Asia, Australia
Big tree > 20 ftFull sunRegular waterWhite/off-white flowers

Sloanea sp., Sloanea
Sloanea sp., Sloanea
Sloanea sp., Sloanea
Sloanea sp., Sloanea


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/sloanea_sp.htm

Smallanthus sonchifolius, Polymnia sonchifolia, Bolivian Sunroot, Yacon, Pear of the Earth

Smallanthus sonchifolius, Polymnia sonchifolia

Bolivian Sunroot, Yacon, Pear of the Earth
Family: Asteraceae
Origin: Andes from Colombia to Northern Argentina
Small shrub 2-5 ftFull sunRegular waterYellow/orange flowersEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.EdibleSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

Yacon is one of the most extraordinary plants of the Andes. This spectacular plant is related to the sunflower & grows very similarly. It is also called "Pear of the Earth" because it's tubers are a delicious flavor that resembles a blend of watermelon, apple, and pear. It is very juicy and crisp and can be eaten raw or cooked. Highly recommended, fun to grow for a fall harvest.

Yacon is an unusual vegetable eaten for over 1,500 years in the Andes mountains, but virtually unknown elsewhere. This delicious root is surprisingly sweet, and is also very juicy and crisp. It's sort of like eating a water chestnut that is almost as sweet as an apple or melon. Yacon contains a low-calorie sugar substitute that makes it perfect for weight loss plans or low-sugar diets. The plants are high-yielding and easy to grow. You're not likely to find this rare veggie in markets, but now you can grow your own supply at home!

The plant forms two kinds of roots: large storage tubers (the parts that are eaten), and central "eyes", from which the plant may be propagated. Yacon grows about 4 to 6 feet tall, with oversized, fuzzy leaves that are triangular in shape. It's an attractive, exotic-looking plant that is worth growing just for the foliage! When the leaves die back in late fall or winter, the tubers are ready for harvesting. They average 5 to 10 ounces each, and are about 90% water, which gives them their juiciness. Some people prefer eating them fresh, by simply peeling them and eating them like an apple. You may also bake them or add them to soups or salads.

Yacon comes from a mild climate, with nights that are cool. It prefers partly sunny conditions, with protection from strong afternoon sun. It likes rich, well-draining soil that's kept consistently moist.

Yacon is an ideal food for people who suffer from diabetes and those who want to lose weight. They are known to be rich in dietary fiber and low in calories. Yacon tubers and leaves have high levels of fructo-oligosaccharide which is a type of sugar that cannot be recognized by the digestive system making them low in calories as a result. Fructo-oligosaccharide can aid in digestion and feeds beneficial bacteria in the gut which can play an important role in lowering the risk of diabetes. The bacteria produce short-chain fatty acids that have powerful anti-obesity effects when digested. Yacon contains a type of polyphenol called chlorogenic acid which has a strong antioxidant effect that is more than that of even red wine. Yacon tubers are rich in potassium, calcium and magnesium which can help people who suffer from high-blood pressure.

The Yacon tubers can be enjoyed raw or cooked, leaves can be used to make an herb tea that is used as a medicine and Yacon syrup can be used as a substitution for sugar in baked goods. Because Yacon tubers are sweet, juicy and crisp, they are perfect for use in salads. In addition, they can be grilled, fried, baked, sauteed and marinated. Use in curry, stir-fries, soups, fried dishes and juices. Choose ones that are slim without scratches on the surface and avoid those with shriveled cuts. For storing, wrap them in a newspaper and store in a cool dark place for up to ten days.

In addition to a food source, Yacon have Yacon used as a medicine by many cultures for hundreds years. Big Yacon leaves are used to wrap food during cooking in South America. The name, Yacon means "watery root" in Spanish.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/smallanthus_sonchifolius.htm

Sobralia sp., Sobralia
Sobralia rosea

Sobralia sp.

Sobralia
Family: Orchidaceae
Origin: Central America, South America
Small shrub 2-5 ftSemi-shadeEpiphyteRegular waterPink flowersWhite/off-white flowersBlue/lavender/purple flowersRed/crimson/vinous flowersYellow/orange flowers

The plants are more commonly terrestrial, but are also found growing epiphytically, in wet forests from sea level to about 8,800 ft.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/sobralia_sp.htm

Socratea exorrhiza, Walking Palm, Cashapona

Socratea exorrhiza

Walking Palm, Cashapona
Family: Arecaceae / Palmae
Origin: Central America, South America
Big tree > 20 ftSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterPalm or palm-like

Probably the most famous of the stilt rooted palms, with the roots coming from up to 2m (6 feet) from the ground. The roots have small, white, conical spines.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/socratea_exorrhiza.htm

Solandra grandiflora, Cup of Gold Vine, Chalice Vine

Solandra grandiflora

Cup of Gold Vine, Chalice Vine
Family: Solanaceae
Origin: Mexico, Central America and northern South America
Large shrub 5-10 ftVine or creeperFull sunSemi-shadeModerate waterWhite/off-white flowersYellow/orange flowersFragrantEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.Attracts butterflies, hummingbirdsPoisonous or toxicFlood tolerantSeaside, salt tolerant plant

Other species occur in the West Indies. Striking vine with glossy leaves and large showy white to yellow flowers. You can plant container plants at any time, but October is ideal, since it is a time of rapid growth. Plant near a wall, and water well. Use a slow release fertilizer in the fall. The 6-8 inch flowers are chalice shaped. They have a yellow corolla , with 5 purple lines. They bloom usually from February until May. Thick stemmed tropical liana with large shiny leaves and large bell shaped golden yellow flowers. The thick and woody ropelike stems branch frequently and root at their nodes, and can run for more than 30-40 ft. (9-12 m), clinging with aerial rootlets and scrambling over everything in the way. The evergreen leaves are leathery, about 6" long and elliptic, with prominent lighter colored midribs and lateral veins. They are fragrant, especially at night, with a scent reminiscent of coconut. Cup of gold blooms intermittently through the year, but mainly in the winter dry season. The fruits, rarely seen in cultivation, are round berries, about 2" in diameter. There are eight species of chalice vines, and they often are confused in the trade. Solandra maxima is the most common species in cultivation and vines offered as S. guttata and S. grandiflora may in fact be this one. The differences are subtle. Cup of gold is a fast growing vine that thrives in most any well-drained soil. It tolerates severe pruning and blooms on new growth, so it can be cut back at any time of year. This is a heavy vine, and it requires a very sturdy support. Let the vine grow for a while, producing vigorous new shoots, then withhold water until the leaves begin to wilt. Hardiness: USDA Zones 10 - 11. Propagation: Cup of gold usually is propagated from stem cuttings taken in summer and rooted with bottom heat. Usage Cup of gold is often grown on large pergolas or trellises, or trained to grow up the side of a house where the spectacular flowers can spill down the walls over windows and doorways. Tolerant of salt spray and salty soils, all the chalice vines are excellent for seaside gardens. This is a large, rampant grower which requires plenty of space and a strong support. The chalice vines are related to the angel trumpets (Datura spp. and Brugmansia spp.), and like them, have hallucinogenic properties. They are used in sacred ceremonies in Mexico.

Poisonous parts: leaves and flowers.

See Article about this plant.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/solandra_grandiflora.htm

Solandra grandiflora - Cup of Gold, Chalice Vine

Cup of Gold Vine, Chalice Vine - very fast-growing vigorous vine or shrub with fragrant flowers and large leathery leaves.
See Article about this plant.

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