TROPICAL PLANT ENCYCLOPEDIA


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Siderasis fuscata, Brown Spiderwort, Bears Ears

Siderasis fuscata

Brown Spiderwort, Bears Ears
Family: Commelinaceae
Origin: Eastern Brazil
Small shrub 2-5 ftSemi-shadeRegular waterPink flowersOrnamental foliage

Although it is cultivated mostly for its leaves, the brown spiderwort has attractive purple flowers, up to 1 inch in diameter.

Propagation: Division.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/siderasis_fuscata.htm

Sideroxylon sp., Bully Tree, Manglier, Dodo Tree
Sideroxylon cinerum

Sideroxylon sp.

Bully Tree, Manglier, Dodo Tree
Family: Sapotaceae
Origin: South Africa, Madagascar, Mascarene Islands
Big tree > 20 ftSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunRegular waterModerate waterWhite/off-white flowersYellow/orange flowersEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.Attracts butterflies, hummingbirdsEdibleSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

A genus of tropical trees noted for their extremely hard wood. Several species have become rare due to logging and other forms of habitat destruction.

Sideroxylon inerme (White Milkwood)is a protected species in South Africa. Three specimens have been proclaimed National Monuments. One of these is situated in Mossel Bay and is called the 'Post Office Tree'. Portuguese soldiers in 1500 tied a shoe containing a letter on the tree, describing the drowning at sea of the famous Bartholomew Dias. This tree is said to be 600 years old. Another renowned specimen is the Treaty Tree in Woodstock, Cape Town. Next to this tree stood a small house where the commander of local defences handed over the Cape to the British in 1806. The third National Monument is a tree called Fingo Milkwood Tree near Peddie in the Eastern Cape. The Fingo people affirmed their loyalty to God and the British king under the tree after English soldiers led them to safety when Chief Hintza and his warriors pursued them.

Bark and roots have medicinal value and are used to cure broken bones, to treat fevers, to dispel bad dreams, and to treat gall sickness in stock. The wood of the White Milkwood is said to very hard and fine-grained and is used as timber for building boats, bridges and mills. Ripe purple-black berries are said to be edible, with purple, juicy flesh and sticky white juice.

In 1973, it was thought that endemic to Mauritius, Sideroxylon grandiflorum (Tambalacoque, Dodo Tree) was dying out. There were supposedly only 13 specimens left, all estimated to be about 300 years old. It was hypothesized that the Dodo, which became extinct in the 17th century, ate tambalacoque fruits, and only by passing through the digestive tract of the Dodo could the seeds germinate. However, further research proved that the situation is not as bad as it seemed. The scientists tried to force-feed Tambalacoque fruit to other animals, such as wild turkeys, and did get some seeds germinated. The Tambalacoque seeds, passed through digestive systems of Aldabra Giant Tortoise (Geochelone gigantea) had pretty good gemination rate, and yet the seedlings appeared to be more vigorous and disease-resistant. To aid the seed in germination, botanists now use turkeys and gem polishers to erode the endocarp to allow germination. Tambalacoque is highly valued for its wood in Mauritius, which has led some foresters to scrape the pits by hand to make them sprout and grow. So the species seems to be out of danger now; besides, young trees are not distinct in appearance and may easily be confused with similar species.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/sideroxylon_sp.htm

Silybum marianum, Carduus marianus, Mary Thistle, Milk Thistle

Silybum marianum, Carduus marianus

Mary Thistle, Milk Thistle
Family: Asteraceae
Origin: India
Large shrub 5-10 ftSmall shrub 2-5 ftFull sunSemi-shadeModerate waterPink flowersWhite/off-white flowersBlue/lavender/purple flowersEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.Attracts butterflies, hummingbirdsInvasiveThorny or spinySubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

A purple flower with prickly leaves whose name comes from the white veins on its leaves which exude a milky sap when broken.

Among all known herbal remedies, Milk Thistle finds its place as the leader in herbs to treat liver disease.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/silybum_marianum.htm

Simarouba glauca, Paradise-tree, Dysentery-bark, Bitterwood, Lakshmi Taru

Simarouba glauca

Paradise-tree, Dysentery-bark, Bitterwood, Lakshmi Taru
Family: Simaroubaceae
Origin: Central America
Small tree 10-20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterModerate waterEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.

The fruit is eaten commonly, but is of inferior quality and not highly esteemed. The seeds contain 60 - 75 5.434722e-323dible oil.

Research has discovered a range of medically active compounds in the plant.



Simarouba glauca, Paradise-tree, Dysentery-bark, Bitterwood, Lakshmi Taru
Simarouba glauca, Paradise-tree, Dysentery-bark, Bitterwood, Lakshmi Taru


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/simarouba_glauca.htm

Simira rubescens, Simira

Simira rubescens

Simira
Family: Rubiaceae
Origin: Tropical America
Small tree 10-20 ftSemi-shadeRegular water


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/simira_rubescens.htm

Simmondsia chinensis, Jojoba, Goatnut

Simmondsia chinensis

Jojoba, Goatnut
Family: Simmondsiaceae
Origin: Sonoran Desert of California and Arizona
Large shrub 5-10 ftFull sunModerate waterDry conditionsEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.

An evergreen shrub, dioecious, smooth, gray-green leaves. Jojoba is grown commercially for its oil, a liquid wax ester, expressed from the seed. Jojoba oil is unique because it is a naturally occurring liquid wax, similar in its properties to "Spermaceti" (whale oil). These types of liquid waxes have hundreds of uses and are very difficult to make synthetically.

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping. Plant does best with occasional deep watering.



Simmondsia chinensis, Jojoba, Goatnut
Simmondsia chinensis, Jojoba, Goatnut
Simmondsia chinensis, Jojoba, Goatnut


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/simmondsia_chinensis.htm

Sinningia leucotricha, Rechsteineria leucotricha, Brazilian Edelweiss

Sinningia leucotricha, Rechsteineria leucotricha

Brazilian Edelweiss
Family: Gesneriaceae
Origin: Brazil
CaudexSmall shrub 2-5 ftSemi-shadeModerate waterOrnamental foliageRed/crimson/vinous flowers

Sinningia leucotricha is an unusual and attractive, long lived, tuberous perennial with a large rounded tuber that can reach a foot (30 cm) across on older plants and from which emerges a few short stems, holding 2 or 3 opposite pairs of small, fuzzy, silver leaves. Sinningia leucotricha has the most beautiful foliage of any sinningia.The showy, salmon colored flowers begin to bloom just above the foliage in spring to early summer





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/sinningia_leucotricha.htm

Sinningia sp., Siningia
Sinningia tubiflora

Sinningia sp.

Siningia
Family: Gesneriaceae
Origin: Brazil
CaudexGroundcover and low-growing 2ftShadeSemi-shadeRegular waterPink flowersWhite/off-white flowersBlue/lavender/purple flowersRed/crimson/vinous flowersAttracts butterflies, hummingbirds

Flowers on the silvery new foliage produced when the tuber first breaks dormancy. Younger plants, in their first year or two of flowering, do not produce as much of a flush of bloom. After flowering the leaves grow to quite a large size and lose their silvery lustre. However, the mature plant can make an attractive specimen, and can be grown with the tuber exposed. Under these conditions, it can make an attractive bonsai-like specimen.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/sinningia_sp.htm

Sinofranchetia chinensis, Sinofranchetia

Sinofranchetia chinensis

Sinofranchetia
Family: Lardizabalaceae
Origin: China
Vine or creeperFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterModerate waterUnusual colorAttracts butterflies, hummingbirdsSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

Sinofranchetia chinensis is a vigorous, hardy, deciduous Climber growing to 15 m. Small, white flowers are produced in May followed by bunches of hanging, purple fruits in October. Attractive garden plant for trellises, arbors or against walls.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/sinofranchetia_chinensis.htm

Sinojackia rehderiana, Jacktree

Sinojackia rehderiana

Jacktree
Family: Styracaceae
Origin: East China
Small tree 10-20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterModerate waterWhite/off-white flowersDeciduousSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

Close related species - Carolina silverbell (Halesia carolina) reaches its greatest size in the southern Appalachian Mountains where it is called mountain silverbell. This attractive shrub or small tree, also called snowdrop-tree or opossum-wood, grows in moist soils along streams in the understory of hardwood forests. It has a moderate growth rate and lives about 100 years. The white bell-shaped flowers and small size make it a desirable tree for landscaping. The seeds are eaten by squirrels and the flowers provide honey for bees.



Sinojackia rehderiana, Jacktree
Sinojackia rehderiana, Jacktree
Seeds of Halesia carolina


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/sinojackia_rehderiana.htm
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