TROPICAL PLANT ENCYCLOPEDIA


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Ceropegia debilis, Ceropegia linearis ssp. debilis, Rosary Vine

Ceropegia debilis, Ceropegia linearis ssp. debilis

Rosary Vine
Family: Apocynaceae   (Formerly:Asclepiadaceae)
Subfamily: Asclepiadoideae
Origin: Southeastern Africa
Vine or creeperSemi-shadeModerate waterUnusual colorOrnamental foliage

This plant is somewhat succulent, so be careful to never overwater, or allow it to set in water. Water thoroughly, and then allow the soil to completely dry out before watering again.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/ceropegia_debilis.htm

Ceropegia linearis subsp. woodii, Rosary Vine, Chain of hearts

Ceropegia linearis subsp. woodii

Rosary Vine, Chain of hearts
Family: Apocynaceae   (Formerly:Asclepiadaceae)
Subfamily: Asclepiadoideae
Origin: Southeastern Africa
Vine or creeperSemi-shadeRegular waterModerate waterUnusual colorOrnamental foliage

The vines of the Rosary plant are like thin wires with marbled, heart shaped leaves. They will reach two to four feet in length, so the plant should be hung or set on a pedestal where it will receive bright light for most of the day. Ceropegias prefer summer temperatures around 70-75 degrees, but during the winter, when it is dormant, it should be kept in a cooler room if possible (60-65 degrees). This plant is somewhat succulent, so be careful to never overwater, or allow it to set in water. Water thoroughly, and then allow the soil to completely dry out before watering again. During the active growing period of spring and summer, the Rosary plant should be fed monthly with an all purpose liquid houseplant food diluted to half strength. Use a porous potting soil with coarse sand added when you repot this vine in early spring, making sure to provide adequate drainage.Two unique features of the Rosary vine are the flowers and the 'beads'. The slender flowers resemble an inverted, small pink vase. The end of the tube is partly closed by delicate purple bars. You'll find that hummingbirds are attracted to the flowers if your plant is placed outdoors during the summer months. The beads are small tubers which form along the stem at the leaf bases. These beads can be planted to produce new vines. Just press the tuber into the soil, and keep it moist (not wet) If possible, plant the bead while it is still attached to the mother plant, for speedier rooting. Once rooted and growing, the new plant can be easily severed from the main plant.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/ceropegia_linearis.htm

Ceropegia meyeri, Ceropegia

Ceropegia meyeri

Ceropegia
Family: Apocynaceae   (Formerly:Asclepiadaceae)
Subfamily: Asclepiadoideae
Origin: South Africa
Vine or creeperFull sunSemi-shadeModerate waterUnusual color

Ceropegia meyeri, Ceropegia
Ceropegia meyeri, Ceropegia
Ceropegia meyeri, Ceropegia


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/ceropegia_meyeri.htm

Ceropegia sandersonii, Parachute Plant, Umbrella Flower
Ceropegia hybrid 'Uranus'

Ceropegia sandersonii

Parachute Plant, Umbrella Flower
Family: Apocynaceae   (Formerly:Asclepiadaceae)
Subfamily: Asclepiadoideae
Origin: Mozambique to Natal
Vine or creeperSemi-shadeModerate waterUnusual colorOrnamental foliage

This is one of the more striking specie of the genus. From fleshy, narrowly fusiform clustered roots, the robust climbing or twining stems bear thick fleshy leaves and the large showy flowers. Flowers can measure up to 10 cm. Light green to striped green white. Flowers appearing in succession from spring until autumn. Stems are twining up to a brighter position. Flowers appear on young stems.

In winter - light watering about once a month with warm water.

Ceropegia hybrid 'Uranus' - Hybrid between Ceropegia sandersonii x Ceropegia radicans





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/ceropegia_sandersonii.htm

Ceropegia woodii variegata, String of Hearts, Chain of Hearts, Rosary Vine, Hawaiian potato ball, Hearts entangled

Ceropegia woodii variegata

String of Hearts, Chain of Hearts, Rosary Vine, Hawaiian potato ball, Hearts entangled
Family: Apocynaceae   (Formerly:Asclepiadaceae)
Subfamily: Asclepiadoideae
Groundcover and low-growing 2ftSmall shrub 2-5 ftShadeSemi-shadeEpiphyteModerate waterUnusual colorOrnamental foliageAttracts butterflies, hummingbirds

The Rosary plant makes an excellent house plant due to it's durability. It can withstand neglect, dry air, or drought, and bounce back with a single watering. The vines of the Rosary plant are like thin wires with marbled, heart shaped leaves, that may get pinkish in bright light. The stems will reach two to four feet in length, so the plant should be hung or set on a pedestal where it will receive bright light for most of the day. Ceropegias prefer summer temperatures around 70-75F, but during the winter, when it is dormant, it should be kept in a cooler room if possible (60-65F). This plant is somewhat succulent, so be careful to never overwater, or allow it to set in water. Water thoroughly, and then allow the soil to completely dry out before watering again. During the active growing period of spring and summer, the Rosary plant should be fed monthly with an all purpose liquid houseplant food diluted to half strength. Use a porous potting soil with coarse sand added when you repot this vine in early spring, making sure to provide adequate drainage. Two unique features of the Rosary vine are the flowers and the "beads". The slender flowers resemble an inverted, small pink vase. The end of the tube is partly closed by delicate purple bars. You'll find that hummingbirds are attracted to the flowers if your plant is placed outdoors during the summer months. The beads are small tubers which form along the stem at the leaf bases. These beads can be planted to produce new vines. Just press the tuber into the soil, and keep it moist (not wet) If possible, plant the bead while it is still attached to the mother plant, for speedier rooting. Once rooted and growing, the new plant can be easily severed from the main plant.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/ceropegia_woodii.htm

Cryptostegia grandiflora, Rubber vine, Purple Allamanda

Cryptostegia grandiflora

Rubber vine, Purple Allamanda
Family: Apocynaceae   (Formerly:Asclepiadaceae)
Subfamily: Periplocoideae
Origin: Madagascar
Vine or creeperFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterPink flowersWhite/off-white flowersBlue/lavender/purple flowersOrnamental foliageIrritatingAttracts butterflies, hummingbirdsSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short timeSeaside, salt tolerant plant

The India Rubber Vine originates from Madagascar and was formerly grown there and later in India to produce a poor quality rubber latex. Has large (2" across), showy, lilac flowers with a broad funnel-shaped tube and five spreading lobes. Leaves are very ornamental, wide, deep green and waxy. This exotic woody vine poses a significant threat to northern Australian savanna landscapes. The Rubber Vine is poisonous it contains glucosides interfering with the heart, and ingesting with provoke stomach and intestinal upset. When trimming wear gloves since the sap is very irritating to the skin, and discard what you trimmed rapidly, because the dust from dried plants is also irritating.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/cryptostegia_grandiflora.htm

Cryptostegia madagascariensis, Madagascar rubbervine

Cryptostegia madagascariensis

Madagascar rubbervine
Family: Apocynaceae   (Formerly:Asclepiadaceae)
Subfamily: Periplocoideae
Origin: Madagascar And Tropical Africa
Vine or creeperFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterPink flowersIrritatingSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

They can be grown outdoors in the far South or in warm conservatories. These plants contain rubber, but aren't commercially used for its production. C. madagascariensis has pink flowers. Cryptostegias need a tropical, humid atmosphere and well-drained, loamy soil that is always fairly moist.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/cryptostegia_madagascariensis.htm

Cynanchum viminale, Sarcostemma viminale, Caustic Bush, Rapunzel Plant

Cynanchum viminale, Sarcostemma viminale

Caustic Bush, Rapunzel Plant
Family: Apocynaceae   (Formerly:Asclepiadaceae)
Subfamily: Asclepiadoideae
Origin: Western Africa
Groundcover and low-growing 2ftVine or creeperSmall shrub 2-5 ftFull sunShadeSemi-shadeModerate waterDry conditionsYellow/orange flowersIrritatingEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.

Cynanchum viminale is a leafless succulent plant with cylindrical, green photosynthetic stems. The plant may grow as a shrub or a scandent vine. The stems produce copious amounts of milky exudate when broken. This exudate is caustic in nature and can cause burns if it contacts human skin. The plant produces small white flowers in clusters.

Toxicity appears to be variable, even locally.

An interesting plant for succulent, cactus and rock/cliff gardens and spilling over dry walls. It also does well in hanging containers.



Cynanchum viminale, Sarcostemma viminale, Caustic Bush, Rapunzel Plant


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/cynanchum_viminale.htm

Dischidia minor, Dischidia nummularia, Kadul, Button Orchid

Dischidia minor, Dischidia nummularia

Kadul, Button Orchid
Family: Apocynaceae   (Formerly:Asclepiadaceae)
Subfamily: Asclepiadoideae
Origin: Malaya, Australia
Groundcover and low-growing 2ftVine or creeperSemi-shadeEpiphyteModerate waterOrnamental foliage

Climbing by attaching its roots to the host tree, this epiphyte can reach a height 9 ft. It has pendent stems, and small button-like, silver-grey leaves. The inflorescence is an umbel of small white tubular flowers with a ring of sparse hairs inside. Masses of fluffy seeds develop after the blooms have faded. It prefers a heavily shaded position in a drought, and frost free area. Fresh seed is sometimes used to propagate this plant, or by division in warm, and moist greenhouse conditions. It lives on many types of trees but mostly paperbark trees (Melaleuca species) on rainforest borders. This little vine has cute little coin shaped leaves and can be variegated with cream and gray. It can be grown as a hanging basket or pot, or on moss or bark. It likes bright light but not direct sun over the plant. The mix needs to be kept moderately dry between waterings. They don't like too much water and misting the plant once or twice a week should do the job. Liquid feeding once a month with half strength is adequate. It is also good for terrariums.



Dischidia minor, Dischidia nummularia, Kadul, Button Orchid
Dischidia minor, Dischidia nummularia, Kadul, Button Orchid


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/dischidia_minor.htm

Dischidia minor - Kadul, Button Orchid

Climbing by attaching its roots to the host tree, this epiphyte can reach a height 9 ft. It has pendent stems, and small button-like, silver-grey leaves. This little vine has cute little coin shaped leaves. It can be grown as a hanging basket or pot, or on moss or bark. It likes bright light but not direct sun over the plant. The mix needs to be kept moderately dry between waterings. They don't like too much water and misting the plant once or twice a week should do the job. Liquid feeding once a month with half strength is adequate. It is also good for terrariums.

RECOMMENDED FERTILIZER:
SUNSHINE Orchidasm - Rapid Growth Booster
This item is certified for shipping to California.
Grown in
4-6" pot
4 plants in stock
$32.95


Dischidia ovata, Hoya Watermelon, Dischidia Watermelon

Dischidia ovata

Hoya Watermelon, Dischidia Watermelon
Family: Apocynaceae   (Formerly:Asclepiadaceae)
Subfamily: Asclepiadoideae
Origin: New Guinea
Vine or creeperShadeSemi-shadeEpiphyteModerate waterOrnamental foliage

Miniature hoya with striped tiny 1/2" leaves, dark green and white, exactly like watermelon stripes! Very unusual and eye-catching. It's an epyphite, can be grown in orchid medium or light potting mix with lots of bark conditioner. Beautiful house plant.



Dischidia ovata, Hoya Watermelon, Dischidia Watermelon
Dischidia ovata, Hoya Watermelon, Dischidia Watermelon


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/dischidia_ovata.htm
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