TROPICAL PLANT CATALOG

This catalog is for information only. If you don't see the price - the plant is not for sale.

Pictogram Guide you may also see symbol definition in a pop-up window by mouse-pointing on pictogram
Number of plants found: 82     Next    Go to page:  1  2  3  4  5  Last  

Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, Hibiscus, Chinese Rose, Japanese Rose, Tropical Hibiscus, Shoe Flower

Click to see full-size image
Hibiscus rosa-sinensis
Family: Malvaceae
Hibiscus, Chinese Rose, Japanese Rose, Tropical Hibiscus, Shoe Flower
Large shrub 5-10 ftFull sunSemi-shadeKeep soil moistPink flowersWhite/off-white flowersBlue/lavender/purple flowersRed/crimson/vinous flowersYellow/orange flowersAttracts butterflies, hummingbirdsSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short timeSeaside, salt tolerant plant

The Hibiscus request frequent deep watering, but good drainage. It is sensitive to root rot if the ground stays soaked. Check regularly for aphids and mealy bugs, and fertilize.The flowers last only a day or two, but they are produced in abundance most of the year. More pictures of different varieties: Hibiscus page and Catalog of Fancy varieties





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/hibiscus_rosasinensis.htm

Hibiscus rosa-sinensis variegatus, Variegated Hibiscus, Hibiscus Cooperi

Click to see full-size image
Hibiscus 'Hummels Fantasy'
Hibiscus rosa-sinensis variegatus
Family: Malvaceae
Variegated Hibiscus, Hibiscus Cooperi
Large shrub 5-10 ftFull sunSemi-shadeKeep soil moistRegular waterOrnamental foliageRed/crimson/vinous flowersAttracts butterflies, hummingbirds

There are a number of cultivars often associated with 'Hibiscus Cooperi', like 'Snow Queen', 'Roseflake', 'Snowflake' and 'Hummels Fantasy'― an even more compact cultivar with lots of white variegation in the leaves.

Green foliage is dramatically splashed with bright white which provides striking contrast to the large red flowers. A festival of color as a patio container or landscape specimen. The Variegated Hibiscus is a large shrub with red flowers set against lovely variegated green, white and pink leaves. Large serrated edged flowers are red and are trumpeted shaped. The are often held in a semi-pendulous manner and when looked from the front, have a star shape. The floral tube is outrageously long and is covered in yellow stamens. This plant grows dense and large. The variegated leaves change color with age, and when planted in more sun, often hold on to the red and pink colors better. Variegated Hibiscus will be showiest around other plants that are dark green or dark red with larger, bolder and non-variegated leaves.

Tropical hibiscus is heat tolerant and prefers neutral to acidic, well-drained soil and full sun. These vibrantly blooming plants can be grown in mixed borders, or in large containers that can be moved indoors to overwinter if necessary.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/hibiscus_variegated.htm

Hibiscus variegated Snow Queen

Click to see full-size image

Green foliage is dramatically splashed with bright...  more
RECOMMENDED FERTILIZER:
SUNSHINE Megaflor - Bloom Nutrition Booster
This item is certified for shipping to California.
Grown in 6"/1 gal pot

Notify me when available

 

 


Rosa (double flower) , Rose

Click to see full-size image
Rosa (double flower)
Family: Rosaceae
Rose
Large shrub 5-10 ftVine or creeperSmall shrub 2-5 ftFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterModerate waterPink flowersWhite/off-white flowersBlue/lavender/purple flowersUnusual colorRed/crimson/vinous flowersYellow/orange flowersFragrantDeciduousAttracts butterflies, hummingbirdsEdibleThorny or spinySubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

The Rose is the most popular garden flower. Highly valued for its form, fragrance and endless variety of color. Tremendous progress has been made in raising new varieties by crossbreeding and selection. New types have arisen; the season of blooming has been prolonged to such an extent that many modern varieties (including climbers) bloom intermittently or in some instances continuously throughout the summer and autumn months. Only a severe frost puts an end to their blooming season. The species of wild Roses are classed under Rosa and a few hybrids that resemble wild kinds, but for garden purposes, the remaining types are grouped in various ways: according to their habits of growth; according to their ancestry; according to the manner in which they are grafted, budded or trained; and in a number of other ways. These groups are not always clear. They often overlap, but are generally convenient and practicable. It's important that the person interested in Roses be familiar with the different types of Roses even though he may not be able, at sight, to place any given Rose in a specific category. The basic of the Rose classes are: Hybrid Teas, Hybrid Perpetuals, Floribunda Roses, Polyanthas, Hybrid Sweetbriers, Miniature Roses, China Roses (Rosa chinensis semperflorens), French Roses (Rosa gallica), Damask Rose, Moss Rose, Shrub Roses, Rugosa Roses, etc. Roses need special care and diligence in the spring and early summer in fighting pests. The most important thing is having deep and rich soil. By digging deeply, adding manure and good loamy soil, Roses of high standard may be grown in any sunny garden. Whether the soil is light or heavy, deep digging is necessary. This consists of breaking up the subsoil or underlayer and replacing the top layer. Light sandy soil needs an addition of fibrous rooted turf that has been stacked for a year or two, with layers of farmyard manure between. Compost is also good. Generous amounts of rotted cow or horse manure is recommended. See Roses Page





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/rosa_double_flower.htm

Rosa banksiae, Lady Banks Rose

Click to see full-size image
Rosa banksiae
Family: Rosaceae
Lady Banks Rose
Origin: China
Vine or creeperFull sunModerate waterWhite/off-white flowersYellow/orange flowersSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

The Lady Banks Rose is well known in mild climates for its vigorous growth, evergreen foliage, and mostly thornless stems. It is found in four main forms: white or yellow, single or double. The clean, shiny foliage is handsome throughout the year, and the spectacular spring flower display is memorable. To hold its large size, the strong support of a pergola or arbor is required, but this species has also been trained into trees to great effect. It will also work well as a large scale bank cover. Rosa banksiae Lutea is said to be the hardiest form of the species, and can be grown in England, but requires plenty of warm and sun in order to do well. The Yellow Lady Banks Rose is non-fragrant, evergreen rose with long, narrow lancelot leaves. This Rose blooms on 2nd and 3rd year wood so keep dead canes and older growth pruned out. It will do well in poor soils and is insect, and disease resistant. It may be propagated in the spring from softwood cuttings. One specimen of Rosa banksiae in Tombstone, Arizona is listed in Guinness’ Book of World Records as the worlds largest rose tree at 113 years, and measures 70 feet long.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/rosa_banksiae.htm

Rosa hugonis, Father Hugo Rose, Golden Rose of China

Click to see full-size image
Rosa hugonis
Family: Rosaceae
Father Hugo Rose, Golden Rose of China
Origin: China
Large shrub 5-10 ftFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterModerate waterYellow/orange flowersDeciduousThorny or spinySubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time



Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/rosa_hugonis.htm

Rosa sp. (single flower), Wild Rose

Click to see full-size image
Rosa primula
Rosa sp. (single flower)
Family: Rosaceae
Wild Rose
Large shrub 5-10 ftVine or creeperSmall shrub 2-5 ftFull sunKeep soil moistPink flowersWhite/off-white flowersRed/crimson/vinous flowersYellow/orange flowersFragrantEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.Attracts butterflies, hummingbirdsEdibleThorny or spinySubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

The Rose is the most popular garden flower. Highly valued for its form, fragrance and endless variety of color. Tremendous progress has been made in raising new varieties by crossbreeding and selection. New types have arisen; the season of blooming has been prolonged to such an extent that many modern varieties (including climbers) bloom intermittently or in some instances continuously throughout the summer and autumn months. Only a severe frost puts an end to their blooming season. The species of wild Roses are classed under Rosa and a few hybrids that resemble wild kinds, but for garden purposes, the remaining types are grouped in various ways: according to their habits of growth; according to their ancestry; according to the manner in which they are grafted, budded or trained; and in a number of other ways. These groups are not always clear. They often overlap, but are generally convenient and practicable. It's important that the person interested in Roses be familiar with the different types of Roses even though he may not be able, at sight, to place any given Rose in a specific category. The basic of the Rose classes are: Hybrid Teas, Hybrid Perpetuals, Floribunda Roses, Polyanthas, Hybrid Sweetbriers, Miniature Roses, China Roses (Rosa chinensis semperflorens), French Roses (Rosa gallica), Damask Rose, Moss Rose, Shrub Roses, Rugosa Roses, etc. Roses need special care and diligence in the spring and early summer in fighting pests. The most important thing is having deep and rich soil. By digging deeply, adding manure and good loamy soil, Roses of high standard may be grown in any sunny garden. Whether the soil is light or heavy, deep digging is necessary. This consists of breaking up the subsoil or underlayer and replacing the top layer. Light sandy soil needs an addition of fibrous rooted turf that has been stacked for a year or two, with layers of farmyard manure between. Compost is also good. Generous amounts of rotted cow or horse manure is recommended. See Roses Page





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/rosa.htm

Abrus precatorius, Buddhist rosary bead, Rosary pea vine, Carolina muida, Deadly crab's eye, Lucky bean, Prayer beads, Weather plant, Wild liquorice

Click to see full-size image
Abrus precatorius
Family: Fabaceae
Subfamily: Faboideae
Buddhist rosary bead, Rosary pea vine, Carolina muida, Deadly crab's eye, Lucky bean, Prayer beads, Weather plant, Wild liquorice
Origin: India, Sri Lanka, Thailand
Vine or creeperFull sunModerate waterPink flowersBlue/lavender/purple flowersEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.Poisonous or toxic

Abrus precatorius has small pretty purple flowers located at the end of the stalks. Fruits are short, inflated pods, splitting open when mature to reveal the round; hard and shiny seeds which are scarlet, but black at the base. Seeds contain abrin, one of the most toxic plant poisons known.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/abrus_precatorius.htm

Adenanthera pavonina, Adenanthera gersenii, Adenanthera polita, Corallaria parvifolia, Red Sandalwood, Coral Bean Tree, Saga, Sagaseed Tree, Red-bead Tree, Raktakambal, Kokriki

Click to see full-size image
Adenanthera pavonina, Adenanthera gersenii, Adenanthera polita, Corallaria parvifolia
Family: Fabaceae
Subfamily: Caesalpinioideae
Red Sandalwood, Coral Bean Tree, Saga, Sagaseed Tree, Red-bead Tree, Raktakambal, Kokriki
Origin: India
Big tree > 20 ftSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunRegular waterYellow/orange flowersFragrantIrritatingEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.EdibleSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short timeSeaside, salt tolerant plant

A medium-sized tree up to 15 m high, Adenanthera pavonina is native to India and Malaysia. It has been planted extensively throughout the tropics as an ornamental and has become naturalized in many countries.

The tiny flowers are said to smell vaguely like orange blossoms.

The slender flattened pods become twisted as they split open at maturity to release up to 12 brilliant red, lens - shaped, extremely hard seeds. The ripened pods stay on the tree for some time. The seeds are used in necklaces and ornaments, as beads in jewellery, leis and rosaries. They were also used in ancient India for weighing gold. The seeds are curiously similar in weight. Four seeds make up about one gramme. In fact the name "saga" is traced to the Arabic term for "goldsmith".

In Malaysia and Indonesia, the trees provide shade and planted as "nurse trees" in coffee, clove and rubber plantations.

Although the raw seeds are toxic, when cooked they are edible: are roasted, shelled and then eaten with rice in Java, Indonesia. In Melanesia and Polynesia people call it the "food tree". The seeds are said to taste like soy bean. The young leaves can be cooked and eaten, but usually only during famine.

The hard reddish wood of the red sandalwood tree is used for cabinet making. A red dye, obtained from the wood, is used by Brahmins to mark religious symbols on their foreheads. A red powder made from the wood is used as an antiseptic paste. In Ancient Indian medicine, the ground seeds are used to treat boils and inflammations. A decoction of the leaves is used to treat gout and rheumatism. The bark was used to wash hair.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/adenanthera_pavonina.htm

Aronia melanocarpa, Chokeberry

Click to see full-size image
Aronia melanocarpa
Family: Rosaceae
Chokeberry
Origin: North America
Large shrub 5-10 ftSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeWhite/off-white flowersFragrantEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.DeciduousEdibleSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

Native to eastern North America and most commonly found in wet woods and swamps, Aronia is also naturalized in Europe.

Chokeberries are cultivated as ornamental plants and as food products. The sour berries can be eaten raw off the bush, but are more frequently processed. They can be found in wine, jam, syrup, juice, soft spreads, tea, salsa, chili starters, extracts, beer, ice cream, gummies and tinctures. The name "chokeberry" comes from the astringency of the fruits, which create a sensation making one's mouth pucker.

Cultivar Viking was selected in Europe for use in orchards but gardeners quickly discovered it’s many attributes as a landscape plant. Masses of fragrant, white flowers bloom in spring a bit earlier than the species. Gorgeous red fall colors and extra large berries follow the glossy summer foliage. Persistent, purplish black berries are high in nutrients and can be used for pies and jellies or left on the shrub to provide food for birds and other wildlife. The berries can persist into spring feeding the first returning robins. Viking is self-fertile, so you need plant only one for a full crop of berries. It needs no pruning, is quite drought-tolerant once established in your garden, and as a native shrub, has proven remarkably resistant to pests and diseases. In other words, it is utterly trouble-free and very, low maintenance. USDA hardiness zone 3-9.

Aronia berries are harvested in September and October. Enjoy them in an array of foods as they are rich in vitamins. One of the true super fruits, they are high in antioxidants with huge health benefits. This fruit is used in Eastern Europe in holistic medicine for lowering blood pressure. Fruit should be consumed with caution as excessive amount can cause significant blood pressure drop.

See article: Cold hardy Aronia and its Superfruit: a Magic gift from the Native Americans





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/aronia_melanocarpa.htm

Aronia melanocarpa - Chokeberry Viking 

Click to see full-size image

This plant is deciduous, no leaves in Fall-Winter.


A very cold hardy fruiting plant, Chokeberry is cultivated as ornamental and as food product. Enjoy them in an array of foods as they are rich in vitamins.
Cultivar Viking was selected in Europe for use in orchards but gardeners quickly discovered it’s many attributes as a landscape plant. Masses of fragrant, white flowers bloom in spring. Gorgeous red fall colors and extra large berries follow the glossy summer foliage. Persistent, purplish black berries are high in nutrients and can be used for pies and jellies. USDA hardiness zone 3-9.
One of the true super fruits, they are high in antioxidants with huge health benefits. This fruit is used in Eastern Europe in holistic medicine for lowering blood pressure. Fruit should be consumed with caution as excessive amount can cause significant blood pressure drop.
See article: Cold hardy Aronia and its Superfruit: a Magic gift from the Native Americans
RECOMMENDED FERTILIZER:
SUNSHINE C-Cibus - Crop Nutrition Booster
SUNSHINE-Honey - sugar booster
This item is certified for shipping to California.
Grown in 6"/1 gal pot, leafless in Winter

In stock

$24.00



Calliandra parvifolia, Powderpuff, Pink Calliandra, Plumerillo Rosado

Click to see full-size image
Calliandra parvifolia
Family: Fabaceae
Subfamily: Mimosoideae
Powderpuff, Pink Calliandra, Plumerillo Rosado
Origin: The Americas
Large shrub 5-10 ftFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterPink flowersWhite/off-white flowersSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

The genus Calliandra contains 132 species. Most are endemic to the Americas, but a few species are endemic to the South Asian subcontinent or Africa, including Madagascar. Most species are shrubs or small trees, although a few are large trees or herbs.

This species with tiny leaves blooms almost year round with clouds of pink-white powderfuffs. It is very hardy, survives some freeze without dropping leaves.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/calliandra_parvifolia.htm
 
Next


Use link to repeat this search:
//toptropicals.com//toptropicals.com/cgi-bin/garden_catalog/cat.cgi?find=rosa&search_op=and&keyword_op=and&language=e&number=10
&no_change_lang=1&user=tt&sale=1&first=1