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rare plants - fragrant flowers - exotic fruit

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TROPICAL PLANT CATALOG Printer friendly page  

This catalog is for information only. If you don't see the price - the plant is not for sale.

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Number of plants found: 9    

Amphitecna latifolia, Enallagma latifolia, Dendrosicus latifolius, Crescentia latifolia, Black Calabash, Jicarillo, Savanna Calabash

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 Amphitecna latifolia, Enallagma latifolia, Dendrosicus latifolius, Crescentia latifolia
Family: Bignoniaceae
Black Calabash, Jicarillo, Savanna Calabash
Origin: Costa Rica
Small tree 10-20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterWhite/off-white flowersAttracts butterflies, hummingbirdsFlood tolerantSeaside, salt tolerant plant

Irregularly shaped tree with a bent and twisting, angular trunk. Simple, alternate ovoid leaves, thick and stiff. Waxy, glossy, and dark green, they contrast markedly with the lighter bark of the branches and twigs. Solitary flowers may be found growing amid the foliage or directly from the sides of the bare sections of the larger limbs and even the trunk. They are large, white, and composed of four thick petals fused into a bent and angular corolla tube that flares distally into a trumpet. The green calyx that covers and protects the developing flower during its early development is also fused into one piece, and it splits irregularly when the blossom finally emerges. Five long, black-anthered stamens and a central pistil are found within the perianth. Flowers are nearly present throughout the entire year. Fruits are large (4"in diameter), ovoid, indehiscent green pods with a smooth, glossy texture and an appearance similar to the fruits of the Jicaro (Crescentia alata ) tree. Inside the thin, woody skin of the pod is a white fleshy pulp that surrounds several black seeds. The white pulp and seeds of the fruit are edible. Jicarillo wood is reportedly hard and rot resistant.

Pollination: "Members of this genus are not bee pollinated - the flowers have peak nectar production at night, and you'll notice that they produce quite a lot of nectar. Bees are generally after the pollen, they would probably drown in all the nectar this species produces. The flowers are also pretty big - these are bat pollinated. The bees will certainly visit, but they are not effective transferrers of the pollen to the stigma". (By Susan Grose)


 Amphitecna latifolia, Enallagma latifolia, Dendrosicus latifolius, Crescentia latifolia, Black Calabash, Jicarillo, Savanna Calabash

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Amphitecna latifolia, Enallagma latifolia, Dendrosicus latifolius, Crescentia latifolia, Black Calabash, Jicarillo, Savanna Calabash

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Amphitecna latifolia, Enallagma latifolia, Dendrosicus latifolius, Crescentia latifolia, Black Calabash, Jicarillo, Savanna Calabash

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Amphitecna latifolia, Enallagma latifolia, Dendrosicus latifolius, Crescentia latifolia, Black Calabash, Jicarillo, Savanna Calabash

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Amphitecna latifolia, Enallagma latifolia, Dendrosicus latifolius, Crescentia latifolia, Black Calabash, Jicarillo, Savanna Calabash

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Amphitecna latifolia, Enallagma latifolia, Dendrosicus latifolius, Crescentia latifolia, Black Calabash, Jicarillo, Savanna Calabash

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Link to this plant: https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/amphitecna_latifolia.htm
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Amphitecna macrophylla , Bigleaf Black Calabash

Click to see full-size image Amphitecna macrophylla
Family: Bignoniaceae
Bigleaf Black Calabash
Origin: Mexico, Guatemala
Small tree 10-20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterWhite/off-white flowers
 Amphitecna macrophylla , Bigleaf Black Calabash

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Amphitecna macrophylla , Bigleaf Black Calabash

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Amphitecna macrophylla , Bigleaf Black Calabash

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Amphitecna macrophylla , Bigleaf Black Calabash

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Amphitecna macrophylla , Bigleaf Black Calabash

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Link to this plant: https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/amphitecna_macrophylla.htm
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Crescentia cujete, Calabash Tree, Krabasi, Kalebas, Huingo

Click to see full-size image Crescentia cujete
Family: Bignoniaceae
Calabash Tree, Krabasi, Kalebas, Huingo
Origin: Mexico to Brazil including the Antilles
Small tree 10-20 ftFull sunShadeModerate waterUnusual colorYellow/orange flowersEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.Seaside, salt tolerant plant

A small evergreen tropical tree growing up to of 25' tall. This relative of the Sausage Tree can be immediately recognized by the large, round green fruit attached directly to the branches of the tree. It has a rough bark and simple leaves. Cauliflorus flowers appear directly from nodes on the trunk and branches. Blooms at night. Fruits develop directly from the main trunks and limbs after pollination by bats: they are large, up to 14" in diameter and globulose with a hard green woody shell. Inside there is a pulp that has medicinal applications. The flat seeds are small and embedded in the pulp. In Suriname's traditional medicine, the fruit pulp is used for respiratory problems (asthma). Fruits are used to make the Maraca. The pulp of the fruit contains hydrocyanic acid and is considered a purgative. Because of the durability of the shell after it has dried and the many different sized fruit found on different trees, the Calabash fruit is used to make containers for holding food or water. It is also commonly used in Tropical American folk medicine. The tree has some salt tolerance. Plant in frost free locations, has no tolerance for even a light frost. Calabash Tree makes a very interesting addition to any garden. It is also an excellent host for epiphytes; many species of bromeliads and orchids will thrive when attached to the branches and trunks.


 Crescentia cujete, Calabash Tree, Krabasi, Kalebas, Huingo

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Crescentia cujete, Calabash Tree, Krabasi, Kalebas, Huingo

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Crescentia cujete, Calabash Tree, Krabasi, Kalebas, Huingo

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Crescentia cujete, Calabash Tree, Krabasi, Kalebas, Huingo

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Crescentia cujete, Calabash Tree, Krabasi, Kalebas, Huingo

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Crescentia cujete, Calabash Tree, Krabasi, Kalebas, Huingo

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Link to this plant: https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/crescentia_cujete.htm
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Monodora myristica, Calabash Nutmeg, Jamaica Nutmeg

Click to see full-size image Monodora myristica
Family: Annonaceae
Calabash Nutmeg, Jamaica Nutmeg
Origin: West Africa
Big tree > 20 ftSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunRegular waterModerate waterRed/crimson/vinous flowersFragrantEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.Spice or herbEdibleUltra tropical, min. temperature 55FSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

This medium to large size tree has a lush crown. Huge, oblong leaves are particularly handsome. They emerge purple and turn deep green, with metallic green underneath. It is one of the most renowned tropical species for its fragrant blooms that are unsurpassed in beauty and originality. Like festive decorations, these curious flowers dangle on long, sturdy cords, which are actually modified twigs. They abort if flower is not fertilized, or thicken and become woody if it is. The flowers are heavily waxy. Somewhat reminiscent of an orchid, the arching, yellowing calyx lobes are crisply frilled, margins edged and splotched with deep red, while the petals are paler with purplish red spots. Flowers evolve into large, woody syncarp fruit that is filled with aromatic pulp. The large, pungent seeds embedded within are used like nutmeg to flavor food, or are roasted, ground, and applied to heal wounds or to the forehead to relief headaches. Root is chewed to relieve toothaches. Beetle pollinated.


 Monodora myristica, Calabash Nutmeg, Jamaica Nutmeg

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Monodora myristica, Calabash Nutmeg, Jamaica Nutmeg

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Monodora myristica, Calabash Nutmeg, Jamaica Nutmeg

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Monodora myristica, Calabash Nutmeg, Jamaica Nutmeg

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Monodora myristica, Calabash Nutmeg, Jamaica Nutmeg

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Monodora myristica, Calabash Nutmeg, Jamaica Nutmeg

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Link to this plant: https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/monodora_myristica.htm
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Monodora sp., Monodora, Calabash Nutmeg

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Monodora myristica
 Monodora sp.
Family: Annonaceae
Monodora, Calabash Nutmeg
Origin: Tropical Africa
Large shrub 5-10 ftBig tree > 20 ftSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunRegular waterModerate waterRed/crimson/vinous flowersYellow/orange flowersEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.Spice or herbAttracts butterflies, hummingbirds

Trees or shrubs, sometimes climbing or scrambling.


 Monodora sp., Monodora, Calabash Nutmeg

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Monodora angolensis seeds

Monodora sp., Monodora, Calabash Nutmeg

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Monodora tenuifolia
Monodora sp., Monodora, Calabash Nutmeg

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Monodora tenuifolia seeds


Link to this plant: https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/monodora_sp.htm
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Passiflora coriacea, Wild Sweet Calabash, Bat leaved Passion Flower

Click to see full-size image Passiflora coriacea
Family: Passifloraceae
Wild Sweet Calabash, Bat leaved Passion Flower
Origin: Central and South America
Vine or creeperFull sunRegular waterModerate waterWhite/off-white flowersYellow/orange flowersAttracts butterflies, hummingbirds

Passiflora coriacea is a tropical vine with very distinct leaves in the shape of bats' wings.


 Passiflora coriacea, Wild Sweet Calabash, Bat leaved Passion Flower

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Passiflora coriacea, Wild Sweet Calabash, Bat leaved Passion Flower

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Passiflora coriacea, Wild Sweet Calabash, Bat leaved Passion Flower

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Passiflora coriacea, Wild Sweet Calabash, Bat leaved Passion Flower

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Passiflora coriacea, Wild Sweet Calabash, Bat leaved Passion Flower

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Link to this plant: https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/passiflora_coriacea.htm
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Passiflora maliformis, Sweet Calabash, Conch apple, Hard-shelled Passionfruit, Sweet Cup, Water Lemon

Click to see full-size image Passiflora maliformis
Family: Passifloraceae
Sweet Calabash, Conch apple, Hard-shelled Passionfruit, Sweet Cup, Water Lemon
Origin: Northern South America
Vine or creeperFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterPink flowersBlue/lavender/purple flowersEdibleSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

Fast-growing vine, grows best in somewhat cooler than tropical climates. The rind is particularly hard, and tougher than most passion fruits. This species is native and common in the wild in Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, Jamaica, and from Saba to Barbados and Trinidad; also Venezuela, Colombia and northern Ecuador. It is cultivated in Jamaica, Brazil and Ecuador for its fruits, and in Hawaii as an ornamental in private gardens. The fruits ripen from September to December, are light-yellow with a very hard shell, difficult to open but the seedy pulp is much enjoyed. Yellow-orange pulp is aromatically scented and flavored. In Jamaica, it is scooped from the shell and served with wine and sugar. The strained juice is excellent for making cold drinks. Snuff boxes have been made of the shell of the hard type. This species is noted for its resistance to pests and diseases that affect its relatives.


 Passiflora maliformis, Sweet Calabash, Conch apple, Hard-shelled Passionfruit, Sweet Cup, Water Lemon

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Passiflora maliformis, Sweet Calabash, Conch apple, Hard-shelled Passionfruit, Sweet Cup, Water Lemon

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Passiflora maliformis, Sweet Calabash, Conch apple, Hard-shelled Passionfruit, Sweet Cup, Water Lemon

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Passiflora maliformis, Sweet Calabash, Conch apple, Hard-shelled Passionfruit, Sweet Cup, Water Lemon

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Passiflora maliformis, Sweet Calabash, Conch apple, Hard-shelled Passionfruit, Sweet Cup, Water Lemon

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Link to this plant: https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/passiflora_maliformis.htm
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Sweet Calabash, Conch apple, Hard-shelled Passionfruit, Sweet Cup, Water Lemon. Fast-growing vine, grows best in somewhat cooler than tropical climates. The rind is particularly hard, and tougher than most passion fruits. The fruits ripen from September to December, are light-yellow with a very hard shell, difficult to open but the seedy pulp is much enjoyed. Yellow-orange pulp is aromatically scented and flavored. In Jamaica, it is scooped from the shell and served with wine and sugar. The strained juice is excellent for making cold drinks. This species is noted for its resistance to pests and diseases that affect its relatives.
Ordering seeds info
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Cordia subcordata, Mareer, Manjak, Kerosene Tree, Snottygobbles, Glueberry, Kou Wood

Click to see full-size image Cordia subcordata
Family: Boraginaceae
Mareer, Manjak, Kerosene Tree, Snottygobbles, Glueberry, Kou Wood
Origin: Eastern Africa, South Asia, Southeast Asia, Northern Australia, Pacific Islands
Large shrub 5-10 ftSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunRegular waterModerate waterRed/crimson/vinous flowersYellow/orange flowersAttracts butterflies, hummingbirdsEdibleSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short timeSeaside, salt tolerant plant

The plant is known by a variety of names including Mareer, Kerosene wood, Manjak, Snottygobbles, Glueberry, Narrow-leafed Bird Lime Tree, Kanawa, Tou, and Kou. The tubular flowers are 1-2" in diameter and form cymes or panicles. Petals are orange to peach (very rare variety) and the sepals are pale green. Blooming occurs throughout the year, but most flowers are produced in the spring.

The seeds are edible and have been eaten during famine. The wood of the tree is soft, durable, easily worked, and resistant to termites. It burns readily, and this led to the nickname of Kerosene Tree in Papua New Guinea. In ancient Hawaii kou wood was used to make umeke (bowls), utensils, and umeke laau (large calabashes) because it did not impart a foul taste to food. The flowers were used to make lei, while a dye for kapa cloth and aho (fishing lines) was derived from the leaves.


 Cordia subcordata, Mareer, Manjak, Kerosene Tree, Snottygobbles, Glueberry, Kou Wood

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Cordia subcordata, Mareer, Manjak, Kerosene Tree, Snottygobbles, Glueberry, Kou Wood

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Cordia subcordata, Mareer, Manjak, Kerosene Tree, Snottygobbles, Glueberry, Kou Wood

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Cordia subcordata, Mareer, Manjak, Kerosene Tree, Snottygobbles, Glueberry, Kou Wood

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Cordia subcordata, Mareer, Manjak, Kerosene Tree, Snottygobbles, Glueberry, Kou Wood

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Cordia subcordata, Mareer, Manjak, Kerosene Tree, Snottygobbles, Glueberry, Kou Wood

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Link to this plant: https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/cordia_subcordata.htm
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Myristica fragrans, Nutmeg

Click to see full-size image Myristica fragrans
Family: Myristicaceae
Nutmeg
Origin: Moluccas or Spice Islands of Indonesia
Small tree 10-20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterFragrantEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.Spice or herbEdibleUltra tropical, min. temperature 55F

Nutmeg is a tropical evergreen tree that reaches about 65 feet tall. The nutmeg fruit is similar in appearance to an apricot. When fully mature it splits in two, exposing a crimson-colored edible pulp surrounding a single seed, the nutmeg. The nutmegs are dried gradually in the sun and turned twice daily over a period of six to eight weeks. During this time the nutmeg shrinks away from its hard seed coat. The shell is then broken and the nutmegs are picked out. Dried nutmegs are grayish-brown ovals with furrowed surfaces about 1-1.5 inches long. The spice consisting of the seed has a characteristic, pleasant fragrance and slightly warm taste; it is used to flavor many kinds of baked goods, meats, sausages, sauces, vegetables, and such beverages as eggnog.

The common name nutmeg is also applied in different countries to other fruits or seeds: the Jamaica, or calabash, nutmeg derived from Monodora myristica; the Brazilian nutmeg from Cryptocarya moschata; the Peruvian nutmeg from Laurelia aromatica; the Madagaskar, or clove, nutmeg from Ravensara aromatica; and the California, or stinking, nutmeg from Torreya californica.


 Myristica fragrans, Nutmeg

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Myristica fragrans, Nutmeg

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Myristica fragrans, Nutmeg

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Myristica fragrans, Nutmeg

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Myristica fragrans, Nutmeg

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Myristica fragrans, Nutmeg

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Link to this plant: https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/myristica_fragrans.htm
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