TROPICAL PLANT ENCYCLOPEDIA


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Number of plants found: 26    Prev    Go to page:  1  2  3

Rhodomyrtus tomentosa, Myrtus canescens, Myrtus tomentosa, Rhodomyrtus parviflora, Rose Myrtle, Downy Myrtle

Rhodomyrtus tomentosa, Myrtus canescens, Myrtus tomentosa, Rhodomyrtus parviflora

Rose Myrtle, Downy Myrtle
Family: Myrtaceae
Origin: Southeast Asia
Can be used for bonsaiLarge shrub 5-10 ftFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterPink flowersAttracts butterflies, hummingbirdsEdible

Rhodomyrtus tomentosa also known as Rose Myrtle is a flowering plant in the family Myrtaceae, native to southern and southeastern Asia, from India, east to southern China, Hong Kong, Taiwan and the Philippines, and south to Malaysia and Sulawesi. It grows in coasts, natural forest, riparian zones, wetlands, moist and wet forests, bog margins.

The flowers are solitary or in clusters of two or three, 1-2" in diameter, with five petals which are tinged white outside with purplish-pink or all pink.

The fruit is edible, purple, round, soft.

Common names include Ceylon hill gooseberry (English), Downy myrtle (English-Florida), Downy rose myrtle (English-Florida), Feijoa (French), Hill gooseberry (English), Hill guava (English), Isenberg bush (English-Hawaii), Myrte-groseille (French), Kemunting (Malaysia), Gangrenzi (China) and Rose myrtle (English-Florida).





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/rhodomyrtus_tomentosa.htm

Ugni molinae, Myrtus ugni, Eugenia ugni, Chilean Guava, Strawberry Myrtle, Murta, Murtilla

Ugni molinae, Myrtus ugni, Eugenia ugni

Chilean Guava, Strawberry Myrtle, Murta, Murtilla
Family: Myrtaceae
Origin: Chile, Southern Argentina
Large shrub 5-10 ftSmall shrub 2-5 ftFull sunSemi-shadeModerate waterWhite/off-white flowersEdibleSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

Ugni molinae is also very much an ornamental plant with it's very pretty pale pink flowers in summer, and red berries in the autumn. When the berries are ripe, they give off a mouthwatering sweet aroma.



Ugni molinae, Myrtus ugni, Eugenia ugni, Chilean Guava, Strawberry Myrtle, Murta, Murtilla
Ugni molinae, Myrtus ugni, Eugenia ugni, Chilean Guava, Strawberry Myrtle, Murta, Murtilla
Ugni molinae, Myrtus ugni, Eugenia ugni, Chilean Guava, Strawberry Myrtle, Murta, Murtilla


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/ugni_molinae.htm

Citrus x aurantium, Bitter Orange, Seville Orange, Sour Orange, Bigarade Orange
Citrus × aurantium var. myrtifolia

Citrus x aurantium

Bitter Orange, Seville Orange, Sour Orange, Bigarade Orange
Family: Rutaceae
Origin: Southeast Asia
Can be used for bonsaiSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunModerate waterWhite/off-white flowersEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.Attracts butterflies, hummingbirdsEdible

Citrus x aurantium is a hybrid between Citrus maxima (Pomelo) and Citrus reticulata (Mandarin).

Citrus × aurantium var. myrtifolia is sometimes considered a separate species, Citrus myrtifolia, the myrtle-leaved orange.



Citrus x aurantium, Bitter Orange, Seville Orange, Sour Orange, Bigarade Orange
Citrus x aurantium, Bitter Orange, Seville Orange, Sour Orange, Bigarade Orange
Citrus × aurantium var. myrtifolia


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/citrus_aurantium.htm

Melaleuca sp., Melaleuca
Melaleuca gibbosa

Melaleuca sp.

Melaleuca
Family: Myrtaceae
Origin: Australia
USDA Zone: 8-11?
USDA Plant Hardiness MapLarge shrub 5-10 ftFull sunModerate waterDry conditionsPink flowersWhite/off-white flowersOrnamental foliageRed/crimson/vinous flowersYellow/orange flowersAttracts butterflies, hummingbirdsUnknown name

Melaleucas are commonly known as "Paperbarks" in the tree forms and "Honey Myrtles" in the smaller forms. These names refer to the flaky bark of many species and the nectar produced in the flowers. Melaleucas can be propagated by either seed or cuttings. However, to maintain desirable characteristics of a particular plant, vegetative propagation must be used. This also applies to propagation of named cultivars.

Species and varieties:

Melaleuca alternifolia

Melaleuca armillaris

Melaleuca cajuputi

Melaleuca coccinea

Melaleuca cuticularis

Melaleuca decora

Melaleuca decussata

Melaleuca diosmifolia

Melaleuca elliptica

Melaleuca ericifolia

Melaleuca fulgens

Melaleuca gibbosa

Melaleuca quinquenervia

Melaleuca huegelii

Melaleuca hypericifolia

Melaleuca incana

Melaleuca lanceolata

Melaleuca nesophila

Melaleuca pentagona





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/melaleuca_sp.htm

Myrcianthes fragrans, Simpson's Stopper, Twinberry

Myrcianthes fragrans

Simpson's Stopper, Twinberry
Family: Myrtaceae
Origin: Caribbean
USDA Plant Hardiness MapCan be used for bonsaiLarge shrub 5-10 ftSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterModerate waterWhite/off-white flowersFragrantAttracts butterflies, hummingbirdsEdibleSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

Like other members of the Myrtaceae, myrtle family, Myrcianthes fragrans has spicy fragrant leaves, the volatile oils reminiscent of nutmeg.

This plant has fragrant, white flowers that grow in long panicles which occur periodically throughout the year. These flowers then develop into attractive, red berries that are edible. Butterflies and other nectar seeking insects are attracted to the flowers.

The name Simpson's Stopper apparently comes from the use of the berries to treat diarrhea and dysentery, but all evidence as to this use by indigenous people is anecdotal and has not been backed up by ethnobotanical studies.

This plant will tolerate wet soils but is also drought tolerant.



Myrcianthes fragrans, Simpson's Stopper, Twinberry
Myrcianthes fragrans, Simpson's Stopper, Twinberry
Myrcianthes fragrans, Simpson's Stopper, Twinberry
Myrcianthes fragrans, Simpson's Stopper, Twinberry


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/myrcianthes_fragrans.htm

Polygala myrtifolia, September bush, Chupman Fields
Polygala × dalmaisiana

Polygala myrtifolia

September bush, Chupman Fields
Family: Polygalaceae
Origin: South Africa
USDA Plant Hardiness MapLarge shrub 5-10 ftFull sunSemi-shadeModerate waterPink flowersWhite/off-white flowersBlue/lavender/purple flowersAttracts butterflies, hummingbirds

Polygala is an old Greek name from the words polys meaning much and gala meaning milk, the name given to this genus for some of its members which have the reputation for promoting the secretion of milk. The species name myrtifolia means myrtle-like leaves. Polygala myrtifolia varies in form as it changes to adapt to the different areas it grows in, from the harshness of the coast to the drier inland climates. An evergreen shrub, the most common forms reach about 3 to 4 ft in height with a few upright-growing stems and slender branches densely covered with leaves that resemble myrtle. The oval-shaped leaves are usually 1" to 2" long and up to 0.5" wide. The leaves are light green, dark green or slightly grey. The flowers are carried in small clusters at the ends of short branches and look a bit like legume (pea or bean) flowers, but are actually quite different. Close inspection will reveal that although they have two wings and a keel, they lack the banner (also called standard) petal. All polygalas also have a showy, and very distinctive brush-like tuft on the keel. The showy petals, beautifully marked with darker veins, are usually in shades of mauve or purple, but can also be pink scarlet, or white. Polygala myrtifolia has blooms throughout the year with a peak in spring when the plants flower profusely. The fruit is a small, winged capsule. In the new garden it is excellent as a fast growing windbreak, hedge and colorful shrub able to grow in most soil types from full sun to semi-shade. Its growth is a bit more lax, producing fewer flowers in the shade, but it grows happily in the difficult pockets that change from full sun to semi-shade with the seasons. Polygala myrtifolia can easily be propagated from seed and tip cuttings preferably taken in spring and autumn.

Polygala × dalmaisiana is the result of crossing P. myrtifolia with P. fruticosa.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/polygala_myrtifolia.htm
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