TROPICAL PLANT ENCYCLOPEDIA


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Melaleuca armillaris, Bracelet Honey Myrtle

Melaleuca armillaris

Bracelet Honey Myrtle
Family: Myrtaceae
Origin: South Australia
Large shrub 5-10 ftSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunModerate waterPink flowersWhite/off-white flowersAttracts butterflies, hummingbirdsSeaside, salt tolerant plant

It is a hardy, commonly grown species, often used as a fast-growing screen plant. In its natural state, it grows on coastal cliffs and along estuaries.

The flowers are white, sometimes cream-coloured, rarely pink, and are arranged in cylindrical spikes on the sides of branches, often on older wood.



Melaleuca armillaris, Bracelet Honey Myrtle
Melaleuca armillaris, Bracelet Honey Myrtle
Melaleuca armillaris, Bracelet Honey Myrtle


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/melaleuca_armillaris.htm

Melaleuca decussata, Cross-leaved Honey-myrtle, Totem Poles

Melaleuca decussata

Cross-leaved Honey-myrtle, Totem Poles
Family: Myrtaceae
Origin: Australia
Can be used for bonsaiLarge shrub 5-10 ftFull sunSemi-shadeModerate waterPink flowersAttracts butterflies, hummingbirdsSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

This is a quick-growing small multi-stemmed shrub with upright stems and slightly pendulous branch tips. Small leaves are arranged in two pairs of opposite rows forming a cross when viewed from above. Mauve flowers are carried in small, cylindrical spikes on short, lateral branches or at the base of leafy branches.



Melaleuca decussata, Cross-leaved Honey-myrtle, Totem Poles
Melaleuca decussata, Cross-leaved Honey-myrtle, Totem Poles
Melaleuca decussata, Cross-leaved Honey-myrtle, Totem Poles
Melaleuca decussata, Cross-leaved Honey-myrtle, Totem Poles


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/melaleuca_decussata.htm

Melaleuca elliptica, Granite Bottlebrush, Granite Honey Myrtle

Melaleuca elliptica

Granite Bottlebrush, Granite Honey Myrtle
Family: Myrtaceae
Origin: Australia
USDA Zone: 8-11?
USDA Plant Hardiness MapLarge shrub 5-10 ftFull sunModerate waterPink flowersRed/crimson/vinous flowersAttracts butterflies, hummingbirdsSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short timeSeaside, salt tolerant plant

Melaleuca elliptica is a shrub with pale grey, papery bark that peels in thin strips. Its leaves are arranged in alternating pairs (decussate), each pair at right angles to the ones above and below so that there are four rows of leaves along the stems. The leaves are elliptic to egg-shaped with the ends usually rounded.

Melaleuca elliptica can withstand salt winds in dry coastal areas and makes a good screen against salt spray. It is drought and frost hardy to about 20 degrees F. once established and can hold up to salt laden winds along the coast, making it a good first exposure screen to protect other plants in beachside plantings.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/melaleuca_elliptica.htm

Melaleuca huegelii, Chenille Honey-myrtle

Melaleuca huegelii

Chenille Honey-myrtle
Family: Myrtaceae
Origin: Australia
USDA Plant Hardiness MapLarge shrub 5-10 ftSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunModerate waterWhite/off-white flowersSeaside, salt tolerant plant



Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/melaleuca_huegelii.htm

Melaleuca quinquenervia, Paperbark, Honey Myrtle, Punk Tree

Melaleuca quinquenervia

Paperbark, Honey Myrtle, Punk Tree
Family: Myrtaceae
Origin: Australia
USDA Plant Hardiness MapBig tree > 20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeKeep soil moistRegular waterModerate waterWhite/off-white flowersFragrantInvasiveSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short timeFlood tolerant

In contrast with its relative, a valuable Tea Tree, this Melaleuca has rather disturbing story. Being a tough plant, tolerating both standing water or dry upland situations, Melaleuca quinquenervia was introduced in Hawaii and the Florida Everglades, in order to help drain low-lying swampy areas. It has since gone on to become an invasive weed with potentially very serious consequences being that the plants are highly flammable and spread aggressively.

Melaleuca quinquenervia is an evergreen tree with a slender crown and drooping branches. Melaleuca grows very fast, up to 6 ft per year, and produces dense stands that completely shade out all other vegetation. It usually gets about 40 ft tall, but can get up to 100 ft if conditions are favorable. The bark is whitish and spongy, peeling off in thin layers. The leaves smell like camphor when bruised. The flowers are creamy white and arranged in "bottle brush" spikes; they are followed by fruit - small woody capsules, each containing several hundred tiny seeds, dispersed then by wind and water. A single tree that starts blooming when two year old, can produce 20 million seeds per year. The seeds are stored until some form of stress, such as frost, fire or human- induced injury, including herbicide, causes the capsules to open. The plant re-sprouts from cut stumps and from roots of fire-killed trees. Mature melaleuca trees survived Florida record-breaking freezes. Freezing is yet another environmental stress factor known to trigger mass seed release.

In Southern Florida, Melaleuca occupies now several million acres, primarily within the Everglades system. Its populations have nearly quadrupled over the past decade, it has become one of the state's worst invasive weeds and represents a severe threat to the integrity of the Florida Everglades. Melaleuca was introduced into Florida in 1906 as an ornamental and widely planted for landscaping and for "swamp drying." Seeds were scattered from airplanes over the Everglades in the 1930's in an attempt to create forests and drain the swamp. Even as late as the 1960's, Melaleuca was still being recommended as an ornamental. Today, state and federal agencies are actively working to control the spread of this exotic menace. Biological control agents from Australia have been released. Crews are at work continuously cutting and herbiciding melaleuca trees in state parks, Everglades National Park and Big Cypress National Preserve.

Melaleuca quinquenervia is similar to Melaleuca cajuputi but its old leaves are not conspicuously dotted with glands, not thin-textured and have obscure reticulations.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/melaleuca_quinquenervia.htm

Metrosideros angustifolia, Mearnsia angustifolia, Lance-leaved Myrtle, Cape Metrosideros

Metrosideros angustifolia, Mearnsia angustifolia

Lance-leaved Myrtle, Cape Metrosideros
Family: Myrtaceae
Origin: South Africa
USDA Plant Hardiness MapCan be used for bonsaiLarge shrub 5-10 ftSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterModerate waterWhite/off-white flowersOrnamental foliage

Metrosideros angustifolia as well as Cape endemic. evergreen shrub or small tree with deep-green sheets and white to cream-colored paintbrush-shaped blossoms with numerous remarkable dust threads.




Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/metrosideros_angustifolia.htm

Metrosideros angustifolia - seeds

Metrosideros angustifolia as well as Cape endemic. evergreen shrub or small tree with deep-green sheets and white to cream-colored paintbrush-shaped blossoms with numerous remarkable dust threads.
Ordering seeds info

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Myrica cerifera, Southern Wax myrtle, Southern bayberry, candleberry, bayberry tree, and tallow shrub

Myrica cerifera

Southern Wax myrtle, Southern bayberry, candleberry, bayberry tree, and tallow shrub
Family: Myricaceae
Origin: Caribbean
USDA Zone: 7-10?
USDA Plant Hardiness MapCan be used for bonsaiLarge shrub 5-10 ftSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunModerate waterEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.

This plant's roots possess root nodules, which harbor a symbiotic species of actinomycotal bacteria, which fixes nitrogen at a faster rate than do the legumes.




Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/myrica_cerifera.htm

Myrsine africana, Cape Myrtle, African Boxwood

Myrsine africana

Cape Myrtle, African Boxwood
Family: Primulaceae    (Formerly:Myrsinaceae)
Origin: South Africa
USDA Plant Hardiness MapCan be used for bonsaiLarge shrub 5-10 ftSmall shrub 2-5 ftFull sunSemi-shadeModerate waterEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.Attracts butterflies, hummingbirds

The small oval-shaped leaves are a glossy dark green colour. Typical of this species, the upper half of the leaf edge is slightly cut with fine teeth. A very nice plant for small hedges.



Myrsine africana, Cape Myrtle, African Boxwood
Myrsine africana, Cape Myrtle, African Boxwood


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/myrsine_africana.htm

Myrtus communis, True Myrtle

Myrtus communis

True Myrtle
Family: Myrtaceae
Origin: Mediterranean Basin
USDA Zone: 8-10?
USDA Plant Hardiness MapLarge shrub 5-10 ftFull sunSemi-shadeModerate waterWhite/off-white flowersFragrantSpice or herbAttracts butterflies, hummingbirdsSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

True Myrtle is an evergreen shrub or small tree with dense foliage. The leaves when crushed have a strong scent, aromatic and refreshing, somewhat reminiscent to myrrh or eucalyptus. The small white flowers are sweetly scented.

The fresh or dried leaves are used as a spice, and can be used as a substitute for bay leaves. The dried blue purple berry fruits are edible and also aromatic and have been tried as a substitute for black pepper.

A popular landscape plant, Myrtle can be grown in part shade as well as full sun, and needs only little to moderate water. It can be grown in wide range of soils as long as drainage is good. Tolerates some freeze. Blooms in early summer.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/myrtus_communis.htm

Osbornia octodonta, Myrtle Mangrove

Osbornia octodonta

Myrtle Mangrove
Family: Myrtaceae
Origin: Australia
USDA Plant Hardiness MapSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeBog or aquaticWhite/off-white flowersFlood tolerantSeaside, salt tolerant plant

Osbornia octodonta is a useful tree to grow for coastal protection.



Osbornia octodonta, Myrtle Mangrove
Osbornia octodonta, Myrtle Mangrove


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/osbornia_octodonta.htm
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