TROPICAL PLANT ENCYCLOPEDIA


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Houttuynia cordata, Chameleon plant
Houttuynia cordata Hameleon

Houttuynia cordata

Chameleon plant
Family: Saururaceae
Origin: Japan South to Mountains of Java & Nepal
Small shrub 2-5 ftFull sunSemi-shadeModerate waterOrnamental foliageEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.Deciduous

Foliage: Simple, alternate, oval to heart-shaped deep green leaves; 2" to 3" long; citrus fragrance when crushed. Flower/Fruit: Tiny yellow flowers on a 5" spike and with four white bracts. Cultivars: Plena: bronzy green leaves; Chameleon: yellow, green, pale green, gray, cream and scarlet leaves. Sun to light shade; range of soil types provided they are moist to wet, not drought tolerant. Leaf: Treatment of vineral diseases, external use for skin diseases. Whole plant: diuretic, genito-urinary antiseptic.




Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/houttuynia_cordata.htm

Hoya odorata, Wax plant

Hoya odorata

Wax plant
Family: Apocynaceae    (Formerly:Asclepiadaceae)
Subfamily: Asclepiadoideae
Origin: Philippines
Groundcover and low-growing 2ftVine or creeperFull sunSemi-shadeEpiphyteRegular waterWhite/off-white flowersFragrantAttracts butterflies, hummingbirds

The leaves are thin and beautifully copper colored when young and the stems tend to have an upright habit until they begin to flex as they grow longer. Flowers are wonderfully fragrant, have a crisp, clean, waxy appearance. Fragrance is somewhat citrus-like but sweet. Unusually for Hoyas, the flowers seem to be very seasonal, forming in the autumn. This plant has moderate to slow growth.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/hoya_odorata.htm

Hoya pachyclada, Wax plant

Hoya pachyclada

Wax plant
Family: Apocynaceae    (Formerly:Asclepiadaceae)
Subfamily: Asclepiadoideae
Origin: Thailand
Groundcover and low-growing 2ftShadeSemi-shadeModerate waterWhite/off-white flowersOrnamental foliageFragrantAttracts butterflies, hummingbirds

The flowers are creamy white, numerous and frequent. They have a pleasant, but not overpowering, citrus scent.



Hoya pachyclada, Wax plant
Hoya pachyclada, Wax plant
Hoya pachyclada, Wax plant
Hoya pachyclada, Wax plant


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/hoya_pachyclada.htm

Jasminum humile, Jasminum giraldi, Italian Jasmine

Jasminum humile, Jasminum giraldi

Italian Jasmine
Family: Oleaceae
Origin: India
USDA Zone: 7-10?
USDA Plant Hardiness MapVine or creeperFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterModerate waterYellow/orange flowersFragrantEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.Attracts butterflies, hummingbirds

Jasmine oil is extracted from the flowers and is imported from India. It has a rich, warm, sweet scent. It is a middle note in perfumery. Blends well with all citrus oils, clary sage, rose, sandalwood. Hardy to Zone 8. To encourage lateral branching and greater flower production, nip off the ends of canes that become too long. If plants become overgrown, prune them back as much as desired in early spring. Possible uses (from The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils by Julia Lawless, Element Books, 1995): Circulation, muscles and joints: for muscle spasms and sprains. Emotions/mind and nervous system: for use with anxiety, depression, nervous exhaustion and stress-related disorders. Relieves repressed feelings, bitter jealously, low self-esteem, guilt, emotional abuse. Promotes optimism. Genito-urinary: for dysmenorrhea, frigidity, labor pains, and uterine disorders. Respiratory and immune system: used for catarrh, coughs, laryngitis. Skin/hair: for dry, irritated, sensitive, and oily skin. Actions: Analgesic (mild), antidepressant, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, antispasmodic, aphrodisiac, carminative, cicatrizant, expectorant, galactagogue, parturient, sedative, tonic (uterine).





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/jasminum_humile.htm

Jasminum humile - Italian jasmine

Italian jasmine. Jasmine oil is extracted from the flowers and is imported from India. It has a rich, warm, sweet scent. It is a middle note in perfumery. Hardy to Zone 8.

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Lansium domesticum, Langsat, Longkong, Lanzones

Lansium domesticum

Langsat, Longkong, Lanzones
Family: Meliaceae
Origin: Malaysia
USDA Plant Hardiness MapSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterEdibleUltra tropical, min. temperature 55F

The tree is erect with slender or spreading branches. It has irregular or systematical crowns and can reach 30-90ft in height. The leaves are pinnate with 5 to 7 leaflets. The flowers are small, white or pale-yellow and mostly bisexual. The fruits are oval, oval-oblong or nearly round and borne in cluster of 2 to 30. The fruit skin is greyish-yellow to pale brownish or pink, leathery, thin or thick and may contain milky latex. The fruits contain 5 or more segment of aromatic, translucent, juicy flesh with sweet to acid taste. Lansium is commonly propagated from seeds. The seedlings are generally fairly uniform. They can also be vegetatively propagated by grafting. This will shorten the juvenile phase. The seeds have a short viability period and must be sown within a few days after removed from the fruit. The growth rate of the seedlings are extremely slow, it takes two to three years before the seedlings are ready for planting. Shade must be provided for the young seedlings and wind-breaker should be available in windy area. Constant water supply is essential during the first two years of planting. Mulching is recommended. Lansium responds positively to irrigation particularly during the immature stage and fruiting period. In Southeast Asia it is sais that the langsats are planted not for oneself, nor for ones children, but for ones grandchildren. They are that slow to produce fruit when grown from seed. By grafting superior selections, we hope in this lifetime to enjoy the tart citrus flavor of the delectable, crisp flesh.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/lansium_domesticum.htm

Leptospermum coriaceum, Green Teatree

Leptospermum coriaceum

Green Teatree
Family: Myrtaceae
Origin: South Australia
USDA Plant Hardiness MapCan be used for bonsaiLarge shrub 5-10 ftFull sunKeep soil moistWhite/off-white flowersFragrantSpice or herbAttracts butterflies, hummingbirdsSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short timeFlood tolerantSeaside, salt tolerant plant

Leptospermum is a lovely tree, with flowers which resemble tiny wild roses and spiky little evergreen leaves. It is distributed in Australia, New Zealand and South East Asia. This genus was first recognized by Johann Reinhold Forster in 1776, and comprises 86 species, 83 occurring in Australia, all but two endemic.

The common name of Tea Tree derives from the practice of early Australian settlers who soaked the leaves in boiling water to make a herbal tea rich in Vitamin C. It is said that Captain Cook brewed tea of Leptospermum leaves to prevent scurvy amongst his crews. The nectar from the flowers is harvested by bees; this is used to make Manuka honey which has strong antibacterial and anti-fungal properties.

Leptospermum makes a desirable garden plant, valued for its fine texture, pleasant citrus-like scent of foliage and attractive flowers. It is also great for container and bonsai culture.

In the ground, it can be planted as a single specimen tree or as several plants close together for a terrific wind-breaking thicket. Cultivation is pretty easy as most adapt well to a variety of soil types, preferring slightly acid. Give young trees plenty of water to establish deep roots - this enhances their natural drought tolerance in later years. Shape a single-trunk tree in its early years by cutting off any stems that sprout near the base. Look for the trunk to gnarl and grow "hair" in a few years - it's an outstanding feature of older trees.

When grown in container, Leptospermum requires a bit more attention. Lack of water is the easiest way to kill this plant: it won't wilt, but will go from healthy to dead in a matter of hours. Soil must be kept uniformly moist; the plant can tolerate poor drainage, however excessive water may cause root rot. Water when the soil dries slightly on the top. Leptospermum needs lots of light; if kept indoors, requires a very bright location. Tip pruning after flowering improves the vigor and tends to avoid the woody appearance.

Some species (for example, L. scoparium) are hardy to lover 20's; others are sensitive to frost. Leptospermum prefers it to be a bit cool in winter (below 55 degrees).



Leptospermum coriaceum, Green Teatree
Leptospermum coriaceum, Green Teatree
Leptospermum coriaceum, Green Teatree


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/leptospermum_coriaceum.htm

Leptospermum scoparium, Manuka, New Zealand Tea Tree

Leptospermum scoparium

Manuka, New Zealand Tea Tree
Family: Myrtaceae
Origin: Tasmania, New Zealand
USDA Plant Hardiness MapCan be used for bonsaiLarge shrub 5-10 ftSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunKeep soil moistPink flowersWhite/off-white flowersRed/crimson/vinous flowersFragrantSpice or herbAttracts butterflies, hummingbirdsSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short timeFlood tolerantSeaside, salt tolerant plant

Leptospermum is a lovely tree, with flowers which resemble tiny wild roses and spiky little evergreen leaves. It is distributed in Australia, New Zealand and South East Asia. This genus was first recognized by Johann Reinhold Forster in 1776, and comprises 86 species, 83 occurring in Australia, all but two endemic.

The common name of Tea Tree derives from the practice of early Australian settlers who soaked the leaves in boiling water to make a herbal tea rich in Vitamin C. It is said that Captain Cook brewed tea of Leptospermum leaves to prevent scurvy amongst his crews. The nectar from the flowers is harvested by bees; this is used to make Manuka honey which has strong antibacterial and anti-fungal properties.

Leptospermum makes a desirable garden plant, valued for its fine texture, pleasant citrus-like scent of foliage and attractive flowers. It is also great for container and bonsai culture.

In the ground, it can be planted as a single specimen tree or as several plants close together for a terrific wind-breaking thicket. Cultivation is pretty easy as most adapt well to a variety of soil types, preferring slightly acid. Give young trees plenty of water to establish deep roots - this enhances their natural drought tolerance in later years. Shape a single-trunk tree in its early years by cutting off any stems that sprout near the base. Look for the trunk to gnarl and grow "hair" in a few years - it's an outstanding feature of older trees.

When grown in container, Leptospermum requires a bit more attention. Lack of water is the easiest way to kill this plant: it won't wilt, but will go from healthy to dead in a matter of hours. Soil must be kept uniformly moist; the plant can tolerate poor drainage, however excessive water may cause root rot. Water when the soil dries slightly on the top. Leptospermum needs lots of light; if kept indoors, requires a very bright location. Tip pruning after flowering improves the vigor and tends to avoid the woody appearance.

Some species (for example, L. scoparium) are hardy to lover 20's; others are sensitive to frost. Leptospermum prefers it to be a bit cool in winter (below 55 degrees).





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/leptospermum_scoparium.htm

Leptospermum sp., New Zealand Tea Tree

Leptospermum sp.

New Zealand Tea Tree
Family: Myrtaceae
Origin: Australia, New Zealand
USDA Plant Hardiness MapCan be used for bonsaiLarge shrub 5-10 ftSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeKeep soil moistPink flowersWhite/off-white flowersFragrantSpice or herbSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short timeFlood tolerantSeaside, salt tolerant plant

Leptospermum is a lovely tree, with flowers which resemble tiny wild roses and spiky little evergreen leaves. It is distributed in Australia, New Zealand and South East Asia. This genus was first recognized by Johann Reinhold Forster in 1776, and comprises 86 species, 83 occurring in Australia, all but two endemic.

The common name of Tea Tree derives from the practice of early Australian settlers who soaked the leaves in boiling water to make a herbal tea rich in Vitamin C. It is said that Captain Cook brewed tea of Leptospermum leaves to prevent scurvy amongst his crews. The nectar from the flowers is harvested by bees; this is used to make Manuka honey which has strong antibacterial and anti-fungal properties.

Leptospermum makes a desirable garden plant, valued for its fine texture, pleasant citrus-like scent of foliage and attractive flowers. It is also great for container and bonsai culture.

In the ground, it can be planted as a single specimen tree or as several plants close together for a terrific wind-breaking thicket. Cultivation is pretty easy as most adapt well to a variety of soil types, preferring slightly acid. Give young trees plenty of water to establish deep roots - this enhances their natural drought tolerance in later years. Shape a single-trunk tree in its early years by cutting off any stems that sprout near the base. Look for the trunk to gnarl and grow "hair" in a few years - it's an outstanding feature of older trees.

When grown in container, Leptospermum requires a bit more attention. Lack of water is the easiest way to kill this plant: it won't wilt, but will go from healthy to dead in a matter of hours. Soil must be kept uniformly moist; the plant can tolerate poor drainage, however excessive water may cause root rot. Water when the soil dries slightly on the top. Leptospermum needs lots of light; if kept indoors, requires a very bright location. Tip pruning after flowering improves the vigor and tends to avoid the woody appearance.

Some species (for example, L. scoparium) are hardy to lover 20's; others are sensitive to frost. Leptospermum prefers it to be a bit cool in winter (below 55 degrees).

Species:

Leptospermum coriaceum

Leptospermum macrocarpum

Leptospermum polygalifolium

Leptospermum scoparium





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/leptospermum_sp.htm

Limonia acidissima, Feronia elephantum, Feronia limonia, Wood Apple, Bel Fruit, Elephant Apple, Monkey Fruit, Curd Fruit, Bela, Billin, Kath

Limonia acidissima, Feronia elephantum, Feronia limonia

Wood Apple, Bel Fruit, Elephant Apple, Monkey Fruit, Curd Fruit, Bela, Billin, Kath
Family: Rutaceae
Origin: Indomalaya
USDA Plant Hardiness MapCan be used for bonsaiSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunModerate waterWhite/off-white flowersEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.EdibleSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

This slow growing tree is native in the Indomalaya ecozone to Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and in Indochinese ecoregion east to Java and the Malesia ecoregion. In some parts of the world, this fruit is called elephant apple because it's a favorite food of elephants, while in other areas, it gets the name wood apple because of its hard wooden shell. It is actually considered sacred by Hindus, and is widely cultivated and eaten in India.

It is erect, with a few upward-reaching branches bending outward near the summit where they are subdivided into slender branchlets drooping at the tips. It has rough, spiny bark. It can be grown in a pot as a small specimen or used as a bonsai. The leaves have a citrus-scent when crushed.

The edible fruit is technically a berry 2-3" in diameter, sweet and sour. It has a very hard rind which can be difficult to crack open, and contains sticky brown pulp and small white seeds. The fruit looks similar in appearance to fruit of Bael (Aegle marmelos).

The pulp can be eaten raw, but it is popularly scooped out and frozen, or made into jam. It can also be mixed with coconut milk for a delicious, health beverage, or frozen into ice cream. The ripe bel fruit is sweet and can also be used for making a tasty drink known as wood apple milk. The ripe fruit is consumed as custard with sugar or honey in certain cultures. The raw bel fruit is sour to taste and is used to make chutney, while the leaves of the bel fruit tree are used as salad ingredients. The vast array of health benefits that are attributed to wood apples are mainly due to their nutrients, vitamins, and organic compounds, including their tannins, calcium, phosphorous, fiber, protein, and iron.

It is a commonly known herb in Indian system of medicine to treat various disorders including diabetes. The fruit pulp extract is used in folk medicine against gastric ulcers.

Bel fruit is great for digestion, and a remedy for digestive disorders. The trunk and branches of bel trees contain a gum-like substance called Feronia Gum. Bel leaves contain tannin, which is known to reduce inflammation, and has antifungal and antiparisitic activities.

Bel fruit juice mixed with warm water and sugar is used for blood purification and the removal of toxins. It is effective for ear aches. High level of vitamin C in Bel fruit increases the strength and potency of the immune system.

The Feronia gum, contained in the trunk and branches of the bel tree, counteracts diabetes by reducing the severity of the condition and helps to manage the flow, secretion, and balance of sugars in the bloodstream. Leaves of the Bel fruit tree supposedly help people avoid chronic or recurring colds and related respiratory conditions. They also help in curing sore throat and treating chronic cough due to its function as an expectorant. The fruit is used as an energy food thanks to its high protein content.

Considering the detoxifying powers of wood apples, the kidney and liver can be protected if the correct organic compounds from wood apples are kept at healthy levels.

Liver Health: As a good source of beta-carotene, wood apples also cure liver problems. They contain thiamine and riboflavin, both of which are known as liver health boosters, this fruit also functions as an ingredient in cardiac tonics.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/feronia_elephantum.htm

Feronia elephantum - seeds

Elephant Apple, Bel Fruit. This slow growing tree from India can be grown in a pot as a small specimen or used as a bonsai. The fruit looks similar in appearance to fruit of Bael. The pulp can be eaten raw, but it is popularly scooped out and frozen, or made into jam. It can also be mixed with coconut milk for a delicious, health beverage, or frozen into ice cream. The vast array of health benefits that are attributed to wood apples are mainly due to their nutrients, vitamins, and organic compounds, including their tannins, calcium, phosphorous, fiber, protein, and iron. It is a commonly known herb in Indian system of medicine.
Ordering seeds info

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Nashia inaguensis, Moujean Tea, Bahamas Berry, Pineapple Verbena

Nashia inaguensis

Moujean Tea, Bahamas Berry, Pineapple Verbena
Family: Verbenaceae
Origin: Caribbean
USDA Plant Hardiness MapCan be used for bonsaiGroundcover and low-growing 2ftSmall shrub 2-5 ftFull sunKeep soil moistWhite/off-white flowersOrnamental foliageFragrantEthnomedical plant.
Plants marked as ethnomedical and/or described as medicinal, are not offered as medicine but rather as ornamentals or plant collectibles.
Ethnomedical statements / products have not been evaluated by the FDA and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. We urge all customers to consult a physician before using any supplements, herbals or medicines advertised here or elsewhere.Spice or herbSubtropical, cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

Evergreen shrub, native to the east Caribbean islands, in particular the island of Inagua in the Bahamas, after which the species is named. In its native environment, the plant crawls along sunny, rocky outcroppings, semi-protected from steady high winds.

It is often used as a bonsai plant due to its miniaturized features. Tiny white flowers are borne in clusters in summer. The flowers form in clusters and are followed by reddish orange berries. It prefers full sun, warmth and high humidity. Even a brief spell of dryness can kill the plant. Wants to be consistently moist to wet and never, never dry. Another name is "I Dry-I Die" - unlike many tropicals that can be brought back from the brink of a dead wilt. Bahama berry likes it hot. If grown indoors it will appreciate warm feet during winter (try a heat mat).

It can be propagated from cuttings, preferably in the spring and early summer during warm nights. A decoction of the fragrant leaves, variously described as having the scent and flavor of citrus, vanilla, or pineapple, is used as an herbal tea.

Tiny dense fragrant foliage scented of pineapple when brushed. A good choice for a small topiary or bonsai.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/nashia_inaguensis.htm

Nashia inaguensis - Moujean Tea, Bahamas Berry

Moujean Tea, Bahamas Berry, Pineapple Verbena. Evergreen shrub, native to the island of Inagua in the Bahamas. It is often used as a bonsai plant due to its miniaturized features. Tiny white flowers are borne in clusters in summer. It prefers full sun, warmth and high humidity. Wants to be consistently moist to wet and never, never dry. If grown indoors it will appreciate warm feet during winter (try a heat mat). A decoction of the fragrant leaves, variously described as having the scent and flavor of citrus, vanilla, or pineapple, is used as an herbal tea.
A good choice for a small topiary or bonsai.

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This item is certified for shipping to California.
Grown in
6"/1 gal pot
In stock
$32.95

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