TROPICAL PLANT ENCYCLOPEDIA


Pictogram Guide · Mouse over pictogram for definition

Number of plants found: 153    Prev  Next    Go to page:  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  Last  

Copernicia sp., Copernicia

Copernicia sp.

Copernicia
Family: Arecaceae / Palmae
Origin: South America, Greater Antilles
Big tree taller than 20 ftSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunRegular waterModerate waterPalm or palm-like

It is a large, evergreen tree indigenous to South America, Greater Antilles and Islands of the Caribbean.

Copernicia is a palm that belongs to the palm family and is either a big tree or a small tree, depending on the species. The big tree can grow taller than 20 feet, while the small trees can range between 10 to 20 feet. It is a full sun plant, but it will require regular watering to remain in its best shape. Moderately water is recommended, as the roots don't like standing in water.

For colder regions, growing Copernicia in a pot is not a problem as long as it is taken care of properly. The pot should have drainage for the excess water, and the soil should be kept moist, but not wet. Put the pot in an area where it will receive enough sun and protect it from strong winds. Additionally, add mulch to the soil to keep the roots warm and create a buffer from the cold.

Copernicia is a highly versatile plants that can be grown in USDA Zones 9-11. It is a beautiful addition to any landscape, offering both an ornamental and a tropical feel. This plant requires very little maintenance and can transform a dull garden into a vibrant one. With its tough leaves, this plant is also known to be resistant to drought and other dry conditions.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/copernicia_sp.htm

Corypha sp., Dhaka Plant (C. taliera), Gebang Palm
Corypha utan

Corypha sp.

Dhaka Plant (C. taliera), Gebang Palm
Family: Arecaceae / Palmae
Origin: Australia, Indonesia, New Guinea, Southeast Asia to India
Big tree taller than 20 ftSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunRegular waterOrnamental foliagePalm or palm-like

The palm group of plants, due to its beauty and economic importance, has earned the attention of the Species Survival Commission. Those species that need special attention are the monocarpic palms which, on account of their remarkable habit, produce flowers and fruits only once in their life with faint chances of natural regeneration. Corypha umbraculifera and C. taliera are two such species of South Asia, the former being the Talipot Palm of south India and Sri Lanka, and the latter endemic to Bengal, hitherto believed to be extinct in the wild. Both the species have massive stems, very large fan-shaped leaves and produce spectacular tall inflorescences on top of the crowns at the end of their vegetative development.

The last record of Corypha taliera growing in the wild was in Birbhum district of West Bengal (India) in a village near Shantiniketan where it was in an early fruiting stage in 1979, but the seeds could not be saved as the villagers cut down the tree along with its 20ft tall pyramidal inflorescence fearing it to be a "ghost palmyra tree". A cultivated specimen in Howrah Botanic Garden ultimately flowered, and its seeds were saved, germinated and raised to seedlings. Some of the seedlings were sent to the Fairchild Tropical Garden, Florida, USA (Basu 1991).



Corypha sp., Dhaka Plant (C. taliera), Gebang Palm
Corypha sp., Dhaka Plant (C. taliera), Gebang Palm
Corypha umbraculifera
Corypha sp., Dhaka Plant (C. taliera), Gebang Palm
Corypha taliera


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/corypha_sp.htm

Corypha umbraculifera, Talipot Palm, Buri

Corypha umbraculifera

Talipot Palm, Buri
Family: Arecaceae / Palmae
Origin: India, Sri Lanka
Big tree taller than 20 ftSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunRegular waterOrnamental foliagePalm or palm-like

The Talipot has one of the tallest and most impressive palms with its huge trunk, up to 3" to 5" in diameter. The trunk is covered with old leaf buses. It grows up to a height of more than 100 ft. and has very large fan leaves, up to 16" wide. The leaves, used as parasols and ambrellas, are large enough to shelter 7-8 people. This palm has an enormous inflorescence, shaped like an umbrella which is the largest flower cluster in the plant kingdom. It grows slowly and lives between 60 to 80 years. The talipot has round dark-green fruits falling by the thousands when ripe. When the plant reaches maturity at 20 to 80 years, the tree begins producing somewhat smaller leaves and develops a gigantic flowerstalk at the very top. 12-18 months later up to a ton of mature seeds are scattered as the tree dies.

On the photo by Jean Elms the blooming Talipot palm is during its "dying" moments, over 90 ft tall and about 32 years old. First comes the green shoots from the top which open out into feathery head of small flowers which stink to high hell to attract insects - then the seeds come which is one seed with fruit around it which attracts every fruit bat and bush-baby for miles around at night to eat them.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/corypha_umbraculifera.htm

Cryosophila stauracantha, Cryosophila argentea, Cryosophila bifurcata, Rootspine Palm

Cryosophila stauracantha, Cryosophila argentea, Cryosophila bifurcata

Rootspine Palm
Family: Arecaceae / Palmae
Origin: Mexico
Small tree 10-20 ftSemi-shadeRegular waterPalm or palm-likeThorny or spiny

Cryosophila stauracantha, Cryosophila argentea, Cryosophila bifurcata, Rootspine Palm
Cryosophila stauracantha, Cryosophila argentea, Cryosophila bifurcata, Rootspine Palm


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/cryosophila_stauracantha.htm

Cryosophila williamsii, Lago Yojoa Palm, Root-Spine Palm

Cryosophila williamsii

Lago Yojoa Palm, Root-Spine Palm
Family: Arecaceae / Palmae
Origin: Honduras
Small tree 10-20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterPalm or palm-like

Very showy rare palm, with the trunk has interesting look similar to burlap fabric. It is found only in Honduras and threatened by habitat loss. It is confined to a small area in west-central Honduras, restricted to steep, high-rainfall slopes of the Lago Yojoa. It is a solitary fan palm, growing up to 20 feet tall. The lower trunk bears root spines, which are characteristic for the genus.

Little is known of the natural history of this rare palm. It was formerly used for thatch and hearts-of-palm, but nowadays, it is too rare to be a useful source of thatch.



Cryosophila williamsii, Lago Yojoa Palm, Root-Spine Palm
Cryosophila williamsii, Lago Yojoa Palm, Root-Spine Palm
Cryosophila williamsii, Lago Yojoa Palm, Root-Spine Palm


Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/cryosophila_williamsii.htm

Cyrtostachys renda, Cyrtostachys lakka, Lipstick Palm, Sealing Wax Palm

Cyrtostachys renda, Cyrtostachys lakka

Lipstick Palm, Sealing Wax Palm
Family: Arecaceae / Palmae
Origin: Malaysia, Indonesia, Borneo
USDA Zone: 10-12?
USDA Plant Hardiness MapSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunModerate waterPalm or palm-likeUltra tropical, minimal temperature 55FSeaside, salt tolerant plant

Cyrtostachys renda (Red Lipstick Palm) is a stunning feather palm that is originally from Malaysia but has been introduced to tropical areas such as Costa Rica and Puerto Rico. It is known for its brilliantly red trunk, which is hard to find.

The top portion of the trunk should be kept moist or slightly dry, while the bottom part should be kept moist. It is a moderately fast grower and can reach a height of 10-20 feet within 10 years if conditions are favorable. In USDA zones 10-11, it can be planted outdoors in a spot that receives plenty of direct sunlight, although it can tolerate partial shade. However, it is important to avoid planting it near a foundation as the palm may lift the foundation. If it is grown close to the seaside, additional water may be required as it is a salt-tolerant plant.

Sealing Wax Palm seeds are very slow to germinate, taking up to a year. Young seedlings grow slowly, but once the root system reaches a 3-gallon size container, the trunk will start turning red. This process may take another year or two, depending on conditions.

This palm requires a good overhead light, especially when grown indoors, and constant warmth. It is a cold-sensitive plant and for vigorous growth, it must be kept above 50F. The soil should be rich, moist and loamy, and the plant should be fed monthly with a balanced plant food.

Providing a bright light, the Red Lipstick Palm can be a wonderful indoor plant and a gem of any plant collection. It is definitely worth the effort to grow this beauty!





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/cyrtostachys_lakka.htm

Cyrtostachys lakka - Lipstick Palm, Red Sealing Wax

Extremely rare Lipstick Palm, Red Sealing Wax Palm - stunning feather palm that develops a brilliantly red trunk.
Ultra-tropical plant, never expose to temperatures below 55F. For expert growers only. No replacements/no refunds. Contact us for additional information before ordering
By clicking here you agree to the sale conditions

Shipped at customers risk, no replacements or refunds. Leaf drop possible. We guarantee healthy plant to be shipped and the best packaging. Express shipping optional.
By clicking here you agree to the sale conditions


RECOMMENDED FERTILIZER:
SUNSHINE Robusta - Rapid Growth Booster
This item is certified for shipping to California.
Grown in
6"/1 gal pot
6 plants in stock
$94.95


Dictyosperma album, Hurricane Palm, Princess Palm

Dictyosperma album

Hurricane Palm, Princess Palm
Family: Arecaceae / Palmae
Origin: The Mascarene Islands of Mauritius, Reunion, Rodrigues, and Round Island
USDA Plant Hardiness MapBig tree taller than 20 ftFull sunPalm or palm-likeFlood tolerantSeaside, salt tolerant plant

Habitat: Coastal forests. Description: Attractive, about 33 ft tall, feather palm with prominent crownshaft and swollen base to the trunk. Very similar in appearance to Archontophoenix alexandrae. It is quite a variable species, with several very distinct and colorfull varieties. Almost extinct in its native environment, because the palm heart is highly regarded for eating. It gets its name from its ability to withstand very strong winds (not because it was the only species of tree still standing at a park in Homestead, Florida, after 1992's Hurricane Andrew; its had its common name for far longer than that). Culture: Light shade/full sun, well drained but lots of water. Medium fast grower, salt/wind tolerant.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/dictyosperma_album.htm

Dypsis decaryi, Neodypsis decaryi, Triangle Palm

Dypsis decaryi, Neodypsis decaryi

Triangle Palm
Family: Arecaceae / Palmae
Origin: Madagascar
USDA Zone: 9-11?
USDA Plant Hardiness MapBig tree taller than 20 ftFull sunModerate waterPalm or palm-likeSubtropical, mature plant cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

Dypsis decaryi will do very well in all warm temperate to tropical climates that do not experience more than just a light frost. It will quickly grow into a stunning landscape plant.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/dypsis_decaryi.htm

Dypsis decaryi (Neodypsis) - Triangle Palm

Triangle palm - one of the most unique palm in appearance due to very precise three-planned leaves arrangement
This item is not certified for shipping to California. Do not order it for shipping to California address.
Grown in
6"/1 gal pot
10 Plants in stock
$27.95


Dypsis lanceolata, Dypsis

Dypsis lanceolata

Dypsis
Family: Arecaceae / Palmae
Origin: Comoro Islands, Madagascar in mid-altitude rain forest
USDA Plant Hardiness MapSmall tree 10-20 ftFull sunSemi-shadeRegular waterOrnamental foliagePalm or palm-like

Native to the Comoro Islands and Madagascar, Dypsis lanceolata (Dypsis) is a small tree that grows to between 10-20 ft tall. It is most often grown in USDA Zone 9-11, where it will be able to thrive in full sun or semi-shade with some regular water. The foliage of the Dypsis is its main attraction, with stiff palm- or palm-like leaves that will give the garden an exotic feel.

Growing the Dypsis is quite straightforward, given a good location and soil. They do best in well-drained soil and will tolerate a wide range of temperatures. They will thrive in full sun or semi-shade, although they may need more water in shadier areas. In cold regions, the Dypsis should be planted in a large container which can be brought under cover when needed. They should still be allowed to get some sun, though, to ensure optimal growth.

The Dypsis is a drought-tolerant plant although regular watering is recommended. During the summer months, the Dypsis should be watered once a week to keep it growing well. During the winter months, the amount of water should be reduced to every two to four weeks. To encourage lush foliage, fertilize the Dypsis every month with a slow-release fertilizer or every other month with a liquid fertilizer.

The Dypsis is relatively easy to take care of, despite its tropical origins. With the right location and care, the Dypsis will give any garden an exotic and tropical feel. Growing the Dypsis in a cool climate requires some extra care and attention, but it is well worth the effort.




Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/dypsis_lanceolata.htm

Dypsis lastelliana, Neodypsis lastelliana, Redneck Palm, Teddy Bear Palm

Dypsis lastelliana, Neodypsis lastelliana

Redneck Palm, Teddy Bear Palm
Family: Arecaceae / Palmae
Origin: Madagascar
USDA Plant Hardiness MapBig tree taller than 20 ftFull sunModerate waterPalm or palm-likeSubtropical, mature plant cold hardy at least to 30s F for a short time

This rare collectible grows into a large feather palm with a very distinctive reddish tormentum on the crownshaft. An easily grown palm which likes full sun or light shade, and a moist, well drained position. Quite slow growing.





Link to this plant:
https://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/dypsis_lastellania.htm
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